Pets – Our Family Members

THIS IS “JETTY’S PLACE” – WELCOME!!

PLEASE READ THIS BEFORE YOU CALL US:

DISCLAIMER

Homeless To Independence Inc. is an All-Volunteer, Faith-Based, 501©3 non-profit organization. We do NOT receive any grant funding what-so-ever to pay bills for anyone in any situation. We do not give away money. We do not give out loans against any items for money.

This ministry is supported with generous financial donations that are used to help keep us functioning. Our purpose is to help supply individuals and families with personal needs such as food, toiletries, clothing, household items, furniture and baby/adult diapers/wipes both locally and to areas effected by disasters. At this time, we do not offer any shelter or transitional housing services. Again, we DO NOT pay any bills. We DO NOT pay any rents or mortgages.

If you are actually homeless, or about to be homeless or need emergency assistance of any kind, you can:

1. DIAL “211” from a:

a. Land line telephone. Tell the receiver your situation and what you need. They will give you information specific for the physical location you are currently at plus any referrals you may need. They have the most up to the minute information for your specific area. Dialing “211” will get you help and much more info than this office can provide. Homeless to Independence wants you to have all the information you need to get through the situation you are in.

b. Cell Telephone – this will ONLY WORK if the area code of your telephone is calling “211” within the very same County you got your cell telephone in!

PLEASE NOTE: If you do not have a land-line telephone or cell telephone, go to your local police department, library, or house of worship and ask to use their land-line telephone. They may even make the call on your behalf.

2. Use the internet and go to: http://www.211.org/

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For those of you looking for employment through-out the United States, District of Columbia or Puerto Rico, simply send me an email to:
HTI EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE 05-14

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Homeless To Independence Inc. is not responsible for misprints or cancellations of events by the event holders, landlord and/or their agent, or ourselves. Homeless to Independence Inc. also reserves the right to “NOT” offer services to people and/or persons that are rude, unpleasant, and untruthful in any way shape or form, belligerent and the like.

OCCASIONALLY, THERE WILL BE ARTICLES BY OTHER WRITERS. HOMELESS TO INDEPENDENCE MAY NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THEIR VIEWPOINTS, BUT WE DO RESPECT THEM. THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION!

OFFICE CONTACT INFO:

THE VERY BEST WAY TO CONTACT ME IS TO SEND ME AN EMAIL: ANN@HOMELESSTOINDEPENDENCE.ORG

OFFICE NUMBER IS: 1-732-264-7500

Please note that our office does have very limited volunteer staff and if we are one telephone line we cannot answer the other line. There is simply not enough time in the day to answer and/or return each and every telephone call.

IF YOU ARE ASKING FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, NO ONE WILL CONTACT YOU BACK.

THANK YOU!!!

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Pets Food and Necessities:

Pet Food Coupons – Best Pet Food Deals This Week

Updated 06-02-17
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Protect your pet from the extreme cold
Pet Emergency Preparedness

Bone-chilling winds, slippery icy streets and knee-high snowdrifts-winter isn’t coming, it’s already here! You may be familiar with the dangers summer can bring for pets, but did you know that winter has it’s own set of challenges?

For example, everyone knows that in the summer, a car feels more like an oven to pets and can cause heatstroke; but in the winter, that same car feels like a freezer and may cause hypothermia?

Experts recommend keeping pets indoors during extreme cold weather. It’s just the right thing to do. Below are some tips and supplies to help keep your pet warm and avoid cold weather concerns.
Pet Emergency Supplies
A pet emergency preparedness kit should have the supplies below to help keep your pet fed, warm and secure during blizzards and extreme cold weather.
FOR COLD WEATHER:

sweater
insulated vest
paw socks
paw booties
paw wax
pet-safe ice melt
heated pet bed or pad

FOR IDENTIFICATION:

pet tag with your cell phone number
vaccination/medical records
veterinary contact information
a current photo of your pet

FOR TRANSPORT:

carrier
crate
blanket
collar (with up to date tag information)
non-retractable leash
sturdy harness

FOOD:

1 week supply of food (in waterproof container)
bottled water
portable food & water bowls
collar (with up to date tag information)
manual can opener (if using canned food)
list of feeding routine & behavioral needs/considerations

GENERAL CARE:

puppy pads
any medication
pet first aid kit
flea & tick preventative
pet waste bags
cat litter, litter box & scoop
calming spray
ThunderShirt (calming apparel)

Icy dangers
Facebook and Instagram are chock-full of thousands of delighted pups (and even some kitties) frolicking in the snow. Winter can be a wonderland, but it also has some hidden perils: de-icers, anti-freeze, salt and other snow melting products. These can cause skin irritations and if ingested, can be fatal.

If you live in an area where these are used, it’s important to thoroughly rinse your pet’s paws and belly after a walk. This will help prevent skin irritation and accidental ingestion of any chemicals. Around your own home, use pet-safe ice melting products.
Paw protection
Prolonged contact with frozen surfaces can harm your pet’s paws. In extreme cases it can even lead to frostbite. Fortunately, there are plenty of products that can help protect their sensitive skin: petroleum jelly, paw wax, booties and socks.

If your pup doesn’t mind the feel, booties offer insulation and extra protection from chemicals and sharp, icy objects. If your pooch or kitty won’t tolerate wearing anything on their paws, try massaging a little petroleum jelly or paw wax on, before you go on a walk.
Too cold for comfort
Don’t let your pet’s furry, fluffy exterior fool you; domestic cats and dogs can’t tolerate extreme cold weather. There are breeds that tolerate the cold a bit more like huskies and malamutes; but just like people, their tolerance varies. Breed, size, activity level, age and body fat determine how well a pet can tolerate the cold. Still keep a few things in mind:

Never shave a pet’s coat in cold climates because they need it for warmth
Small pets, short-haired breeds and elderly pets are more susceptible to cold weather.
Limit walks in extreme cold weather and monitor your pet’s behavior for signs of stress or discomfort.
Never leave a pet outside during a winter storm.
Do not let your dog off leash after snowfall. Snow masks familiar scents and your pet may become lost and disoriented.

THANK YOU PETSMART FOR THIS WONDERFUL ARTICLE!

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don't forget fido

and if I may add – their shot records also!

Pet Preparedness Tips

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What we’ve done to prepare our pets for disasters
John Simpson – Community Manager (Contractor)

With the Atlantic hurrcane season beginning June 1, it’s never too late to begin thinking about how to better prepare your loved ones, including those we call our pets. There are a LOT of online resources and websites that provide great information and tips on how to best prepare your pet. Here are five easy ways that we look to when preparing our pets for an emergency:

1) Identify a shelter: Before disaster hits call your local office of emergency management to see if you will be allowed to evacuate with your pets and that there will be shelters that take people and their pets in your area. And just to be safe, track down a pet-friendly safe place for your family and pets. Most boarding kennels, veterinarians and a12-02-16nimal shelters will need your pet’s medical records to make sure all vaccinations are current.

2) Pack a pet kit: Take pet food, bottled water, medications, veterinary records, cat litter/pan, manual can opener, food dishes, first aid kit and other supplies with you in case they’re not available later. Each pet is unqiue, but each pet needs the basics in case of an emergency.

3) Update your pet’s ID: Make sure identification tags are up-to-date and securely fastened to your pet’s collar. If possible, attach the address and/or phone number of your evacuation site. If your pet gets lost, his tag is his ticket home.

4) Protect your pet during a disaster: Animals have instincts about severe weather changes and will often isolate themselves if they are afraid. Bringing them inside early can stop them from running away. Even if your dogs and cats normally get along, the anxiety of an emergency situation can cause pets to act irrationally. Understanding what to expect during a disaster is crucial.

5) Keep an eye on your pet after an emergency: The behavior of your pets may change after an emergency. Normally quiet and friendly pets may become aggressive or defensive. Watch animals closely. Leash dogs and place them in a fenced yard with access to shelter and water. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and your pet may become confused and lost. Remember to keep taking care of them even after the disaster.

Posted 05-10-15

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ADDITIONAL PET PREPAREDNESS!!

Make a Disaster Plan for Your Pets

How to keep pets safe in natural disasters or everyday emergencies

http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/animal_rescue/tips/pets-disaster.html?credit=web_id97309811

POSTED 05-10-15
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AVAILABLE ADOPTIONS WITH:

DIAMOND DOGS RESCUE, INC.
Toni Diamond
428 High Street, Mount Holly, NJ 08060
TKDIAMOND@AOL.COM

Updated 03-08-16

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toxic pets

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Preparedness for pets – Ready.gov
Preparedness for Pets and Beating the Heat

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This sign is at the Pet Supplies Plus on Route 35, Next to Staples and the New Shop Rite, Hazlet, NJ
ebay 07-14.7 061

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DOGS ONLY!! (NOT MY RULES) – All Pet Supplies Plus stores offer free nail clipping EVERY SUNDAY IN ALL OF THEIR STORES!!!

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THIS PERTAINS TO ALL PETS EVERYWHERE!

New Jerseyans Should Include Pets in Their Preparedness Plan
Main Content
Release date:
May 31, 2013

TRENTON, N.J. — The New Jersey Office of Emergency Management and the Federal Emergency Management Agency encourages New Jerseyans to include their pets as they update their emergency plans.

For millions of animal owners, pets are important members of the household. The likelihood that you and your animals will survive an emergency such as a fire, flood, tornado or terrorist attack could depend on emergency planning done today. Knowing what supplies to have available, how to evacuate with your pets, where your pets will stay and how you will meet your pets’ needs throughout the disaster are all critical questions to address.

All pet owners are urged to keep a pet emergency supply kit, which should include at least a three-day supply of food in an airtight, waterproof container, drinking water, bowls for the food and water, current photos of you and your pets together, physical descriptions of each pet, medication, vaccination records and first aid pet supplies. Also include a leash and a pet carrier that can double as a sleeping area. You should consider comfort items for your pets as well, such as their favorite toys and blankets.

Make a back-up emergency plan in case you can’t care for your animals yourself. Develop a buddy system with neighbors, friends and relatives to make sure someone is available to care for or evacuate your pets if you are unable to do so. Talk with your pet care buddy about your evacuation plans and show them where you keep your pets’ emergency supply kit. Also designate specific locations, one in your immediate neighborhood and another farther away, where you will meet your buddy in an emergency.

Evacuating pets may be more difficult if you cannot evacuate in your own vehicle. Pet owners must understand their community’s evacuation plans and ensure they are prepared for any variations and restrictions. If officials call for an evacuation, you should be aware that many evacuation shelters do not accept pets and you must plan where you’ll shelter your pets in advance. Many hotels, motels, campsites and other facilities around the country now allow pets. For information on pet-friendly accommodations in your area, visit ready.gov/caring-animals.

For more information on emergency preparedness, visit the NJOEM website at state.nj.us/njoem, Ready.gov or Listo.gov or call the toll-free numbers 1-800-BE-READY, TTY 1-800-462-7585 and 1-888-SE-LISTO. You can also text PREPARE to 43362 (4FEMA) and sign up to receive monthly disaster safety tips on your mobile phone.

# # #

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Follow FEMA online at www.fema.gov/blog, www.twitter.com/fema, www.facebook.com/fema,

and www.youtube.com/fema. Also, follow Administrator Craig Fugate’s activities at www.twitter.com/craigatfema.

The social media links provided are for reference only. FEMA does not endorse any non-government websites, companies or applications.
Last Updated:
May 31, 2013 – 10:27
State/Tribal Government or Region:
Region II and New Jersey
Related Disaster:
New Jersey Hurricane Sandy

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Planning a safe holiday for your cat

This was helpful This was helpful

When it comes to the holidays, there are so many things to be careful of — not gaining 10 lbs. on cookies, not getting yourself into debt just to buy some presents — and of course keeping your pets healthy, happy and safe. Here are some helpful tips from your friends at Hill’s Pet Nutrition on how you can do just that.

Provide solitude. Guests may cramp your cat’s style, so keep her favorite place free from the holiday hubbub so she can relax.
Keep poisonous and dangerous plants away. Plants like mistletoe and poinsettia are poisonous, and ingested pine needles can cause digestive tract blockage. Keep your pet away from these plants and you just might save yourself a trip to the emergency vet.
Decorate safely. There are a variety of decorations that can cause problems for your cat. Ribbons and tinsel are frequently implicated in veterinary emergency rooms. Light cords, when chewed or frayed, can cause severe burns or electrocution. Prevent these disasters by keeping decorations out of reach or locked in an inaccessible room.
Make holiday trips safe and prepare for them well in advance. Take special precautions when traveling with your pet no matter how you choose to travel. Several days before departing, consult with your veterinarian about how to properly prepare for a trip.
Table scraps aren’t pet snacks. Many holiday foods are loaded with fat and sodium and can cause stomach upset. Chicken bones can easily get stuck in the digestive tract and other foods like chocolate or onions can be poisonous. In short, people food is meant for people. Stay disciplined in keeping your cat on the right Science Diet® cat food formula for optimal health.
Because chocolate can cause illness and even death in cats, it should be avoided completely. Chocolate contains theobromine, a potent cardiovascular and central nervous system stimulant that is eliminated very slowly in cats.
If your cat experiences occasional stomach upset, consider Science Diet® Sensitive Stomach for adult cats.
A holiday recipe for a healthy homemade cat treat. Take Science Diet® canned cat food and cut into bite-sized pieces. Cook in the microwave for approximately two-and-a-half to three minutes. In a conventional oven, bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.
Use dry Science Diet® cat food by grinding it into flour using a blender, then add water until it is the consistency of dough. Make into cookie shapes and bake on a cookie sheet for approximately 30 minutes at 350 degrees. Let your cat watch you make them to build anticipation.

Posted 12-18-12

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Planning a Safe Holiday for Your Dog

This was helpful This was helpful
ADULT DOG CARE
Planning a Safe Holiday for Your Dog

When it comes to the holidays, there are so many things to be careful of – not gaining 10 lbs. on cookies, not getting yourself into debt just to buy some presents – and of course keeping your pets healthy, happy and safe. Here are some helpful tips from your friends at Hill’s Pet Nutrition on how you can do just that.

Provide solitude. Keep your dog’s favorite place free from the holiday hubbub so he can relax.
Reduce stress. Keep your dog’s exercise schedule as normal as possible to prevent anxiety and misbehavior.
Keep poisonous and dangerous plants away. Plants like mistletoe and poinsettia are poisonous, and ingested pine needles can cause digestive tract blockage. Keep your pet away from these plants and you just might save yourself a trip to the emergency vet.
Decorate safely. There are a variety of decorations that can cause problems for your dog. Ribbons and tinsel are frequently implicated in veterinary emergency rooms. Light cords, when chewed or frayed, can cause severe burns or electrocution. Prevent these disasters by keeping decorations out of reach or locked in an inaccessible room.
Make holiday trips safe and prepare for them well in advance. Take special precautions when traveling with your pet no matter how you choose to travel. Several days before departing, consult with your veterinarian about how to properly prepare for a trip.
Table scraps aren’t pet snacks. Many holiday foods are loaded with fat and sodium and can cause stomach upset. Chicken bones can easily get stuck in the digestive tract and other foods like chocolate or onions can be poisonous. In short, people food is meant for people, not pets.
Because chocolate can cause illness and even death in dogs, it should be avoided completely. Chocolate contains theobromine, a potent cardiovascular and central nervous system stimulant that is eliminated very slowly in dogs.
Give your pet a tasty holiday treat without sacrificing precise nutrition. Available in many healthy varieties, Hill’s® Ideal Balance™ Dog Treats are the perfect way to share some holiday cheer with your special dog.
If your dog suffers from occasional stomach upset, try the advanced digestive nutrition of Science Diet® Sensitive Stomach adult dog food or an all-natural product like Hill’s® Ideal Balance™ dog food.

Posted 12-18-12

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This is SOOOO! important for pets everywhere!!!

In Preparing for Disasters, Don’t Forget Fido

Release Date: May 17, 2012
Release Number: 4059-068

CHARLESTON, W. Va. — If you are one of the many West Virginians with a cat, dog, other pet or service animal, now is a good time to start planning for what to do with your furry or feathered friend in the event of a future disaster.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency has worked with the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the American Kennel Club, the American Veterinary Medical Association and the Humane Society of the United States to develop these pet-preparedness guidelines.

Have a pet-supply kit ready, including:

Pet food for three days in an airtight, waterproof container and bowls;
Water for three days;
Pet medicines and first aid supplies;
Collar (with ID tags firmly secured), harness or sturdy leash;
Important documents such as registration, adoption papers, vaccination and medical records in a plastic bag or waterproof container;
Travel crate or other pet carrier;
Cat litter, litter box, paper towels, newspapers, plastic trash bags and cleaning supplies;
Photos of you and your pet together for identification purposes; and
Familiar items such as toys, treats and blankets.

The single most important thing you can do to protect your pets is to take them with you if you must evacuate. Animals left behind in a disaster can easily be lost or injured. If evacuation is necessary, consider friends or family outside the area who can take in you and your pet.

Other options may include a pet-friendly hotel or motel. If your only evacuation option is a Red Cross or other publicly run shelter, be aware that not all shelters are equipped or designed to accept non-service animals. Consider boarding your animals at a kennel or veterinary hospital before going to a public shelter.

Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to evacuate your pet for you if you are unable to do so yourself. Talk with them about your evacuation plans and pet supply kit.

Consult your veterinarian and consider “microchipping” your pet. These permanent implants may be invaluable if you and your pets are separated.

After the disaster, don’t allow your pets to roam loose. Familiar landmarks and smells may have been changed by the disaster and your pet could become disoriented or lost.

For information on pet-friendly accommodations in your area and disaster planning, visit www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/animals.shtm.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Last Modified: Thursday, 17-May-2012 11:37:19

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Cat Proofing Your Home

Curiosity and playfulness are part of your cat’s charm, but they can sometimes get her into trouble. Take these steps to make your home a safe environment.

Beware of poisonous plants

Cats like to chew on grass and plants inside and outdoors. You’d be surprised by the number of plants that are irritating, dangerous and even deadly to cats if eaten. Even non-poisonous plants can cause vomiting and diarrhea.

Keep these plants out of reach or, better yet, don’t have them in the house at all. If your cat likes green stuff, purchase cat grass.

Lock-down

Put child-proof latches on your cabinets to keep your cat from licking, chewing, or eating cleaning products. They contain dangerous chemicals. You probably don’t want the cat lying on your pots and pans, either.

Off the meds

Keep all medications, both over-the-counter and prescription (human and animal) in a secure cabinet. Child-proof containers aren’t necessarily chew-proof for your pet. Be sure to pick up any dropped pills.

Play keep-away

Pack away anything you don’t want broken. Cats love exploring, jumping on tables, cabinets, sideboards, and bookshelves to investigate their space. They may accidentally knock over or break fragile items and knickknacks, then walk or chew on the broken pieces.

Unplugged

Unplug electrical cords. If your cat’s a chewer, she could be in for a nasty shock. You could also deter her from chewing on cords by placing them in a cord protector or coating them with a bad-tasting substance like hot sauce or a non-toxic ointment or spray available at pet supply stores.

Strike the cords

Keep drapery cords coiled out of reach. Your cat could strangle herself by getting the cord wound around her neck or choke on a plastic pull that she’s chewed into pieces.

Check the dryer

Check the dryer before closing the door, then keep it closed when not in use. Cats love to hole up in dark, quiet places, and tragedies have occurred. Kittens often climb into refrigerators, freezers, and dresser drawers, so check these, too, before closing them.

Unset the table

Remove tablecloths from unattended tables. New kittens are especially curious about what’s up there on the table and will try to climb the tablecloth. The result could be broken china and crystal and an emergency trip to the veterinarian.

Put a lid on it

Keep the toilet seats down. A kitten could fall in and be unable to get out.

Under cover

Cover garbage disposal switches. Natural climbers, cats usually find their way to the kitchen sink sooner or later. Many have been known to play with electric switches such as the one for a garbage disposal. Special covers are available at hardware stores to help avoid disaster.

Screen it

Make sure your screen door has a secure latch. Don’t run the risk that your cat could slip out unnoticed. Check that your window screens are secure and sturdy.

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The Theobromine in chocolate is toxic to dogs because they can’t digest it as efficiently as humans. It can cause irregular heartbeat,
muscle spasms, hyperactivity, and in large quantities, even death.

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People travel with their pets for practical and sentimental reasons . . .

Why leave members of your family back at home when all you’ll do is wish they were with you on your vacation? Virginia wants you
to bring your pets along with you!

More and more places accommodate animals today — hotels and campgrounds, state parks and outdoor shopping centers, tourist
attractions and outdoor events — so that our four-legged friends can feel part of the fun.

Of course, service and guide dogs are welcome everywhere with their humans!

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Animal Rescue
Hi, all you animal lovers. This is pretty simple.. Please tell ten friends to tell ten today! The Animal Rescue Site is having trouble
getting enough people to click on it daily to meet their quota of getting free food donated every day to abused and neglected animals.

**It takes less than a minute to go to their site and click on “feed an animal in need” for free. It’s in a purple box in the middle of the
page.

**This doesn’t cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate food to
abandoned/neglected animals in exchange or advertising.
Here’s the web site! Pass it along to people you know.
http://www.theanimalrescuesite.com/ <
AGAIN, PLEASE TELL 10 FRIENDS!!! you will have done good!

EDITOR’S NOTE: THIS IS TOTALLY FREE, AS I HAVE DONE THIS TODAY MYSELF!

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YOUR PET AND EMERGENCIES: HOW TO PREPARE

If any good has resulted from the news of hurricane related disasters and local storm flooding that forced many
people from their homes, it is that no one is immune to such calamities. Every household should have an
emergency plan that includes ensuring the safety of their pets.

Remember, most emergency shelters and many hotels/motels do not accommodate pets.

With this in mind, consider some of these suggestions as you develop your own household emergency plan:

– Keep your pet’s shots current and their records handy. Most kennels require proof of current rabies and
distemper shots. It is a good idea to keep these papers with other important papers you would carry if you
needed to evacuate.

– Contact motels and hotels outside your area to determine if they will accept pets in an emergency. Keep a list
of these hotels so you can refer to it in the event of an emergency.

– Make sure your pets wear identification. Consider a microchip identification for your pet which is a service
offered by the MCSPCA and many veterinarians. Identification tags are a must, even if your pet is microchipped.
Some shelters or animal control services cannot read microchips, so it is very important that your pet is wearing
ID tags.

– Make arrangements with friends or relatives who live outside of your area to take care of your pet(s) in the
event you are unable to keep them with you.

– **Take photos of your pets with your name, address and phone number on the back in case you are separated.
Include the contact information of your vet also, just in case.

– Assemble an emergency supply kit which includes some of the following:
o Medications (with instructions) o Food for at least 3-4 days o Water, bedding
o Kitty litter and tray o Bedding material o Crate or carriers for your pets

– If you are forced to evacuate your home take your pets with you. You may not be able to return to home for
several days or weeks. Never, ever leave a dog chained to his doghouse! He can drown or suffer other harmful
injuries by not being able to move or reach higher ground in case of flooding. Do not leave your animal alone
outside under any circumstances. Pets, like other members of your family, deserve the protection and security
of emergency preparedness. We urge you to contact your elected officials to urge them that accommodations
for pets must be included in emergency and disaster planning. How heartbreaking it must have been for people
in the stricken areas to leave their pets behind. After all, for most of us our pets are our family too. Plan today
for their future. Please remember that the worst time to think about where your pet will go in an emergency is
when the emergency is upon you. By planning ahead, all the members of your family, including your animal
companions, can be safe, so that you can all be reunited when the crisis has passed.

For more information check out http://www.state.nj.us/njoem/preparedness.html.

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WE LEAVE NO STONE UNTURNED WHEN IT COMES TO HELPING OTHERS!!

 

 

 

 

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