NEW YORK EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND DISASTER RESPONSE

NEW YORK EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS AND DISASTER RESPONSE

PLEASE READ THIS BEFORE YOU CALL US:

DISCLAIMER

Homeless To Independence Inc. is an All-Volunteer, Faith-Based, 501©3 non-profit organization. We do NOT receive any grant funding what-so-ever to pay bills for anyone in any situation. We do not give away money. We do not give out loans against any items for money.

This ministry is supported with generous financial donations that are used to help keep us functioning. Our purpose is to help supply individuals and families with personal needs such as food, toiletries, clothing, household items, furniture and baby/adult diapers/wipes both locally and to areas effected by disasters . At this time, we do not offer any shelter or transitional housing services. Again, we DO NOT pay any bills. We DO NOT pay any rents or mortgages.

If you are actually homeless, or about to be homeless or need emergency assistance of any kind, you can:

1. DIAL “211” from a:

a. Land line telephone. Tell the receiver your situation and what you need. They will give you information specific for the physical location you are currently at plus any referrals you may need. They have the most up to the minute information for your specific area. Dialing “211” will get you help and much more info than this office can provide. Homeless to Independence wants you to have all the information you need to get through the situation you are in.

b. Cell Telephone – This will ONLY bring you to the correct information center in the area code within the very same City/Town in the County & State you purchased/acquired your cell telephone in!

PLEASE NOTE: If you do not have a land-line telephone or cell telephone, go to your local police department, library, or house of worship and ask to use their land-line telephone. They may even make the call on your behalf.

2. Use the internet and go to: http://www.211.org/

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For those of you looking for employment through-out the United States, District of Columbia or Puerto Rico, simply send me an email to:
HTI EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE 05-14

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Homeless To Independence Inc. is not responsible for misprints or cancellations of events by the event holders, landlord and/or their agent, or ourselves. Homeless to Independence Inc. also reserves the right to “NOT” offer services to people and/or persons that are rude, unpleasant, and untruthful in any way shape or form, belligerent and the like.

OCCASIONALLY, THERE WILL BE ARTICLES BY OTHER WRITERS. HOMELESS TO INDEPENDENCE MAY NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THEIR VIEWPOINTS, BUT WE DO RESPECT THEM. THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION!

OFFICE CONTACT INFO:

THE VERY BEST WAY TO CONTACT ME IS TO SEND ME AN EMAIL: ANN@HOMELESSTOINDEPENDENCE.ORG

OFFICE NUMBER IS: 1-732-264-7500

Please note that our office does have very limited volunteer staff and if we are one telephone line we cannot answer the other line. There is simply not enough time in the day to answer and/or return each and every telephone call.

IF YOU ARE ASKING FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, NO ONE WILL CONTACT YOU BACK.

THANK YOU!!!

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You are more than welcome to send in information on your on your emergency preparedness events…..
to newyork@homelesstoindependence.org

Thank you!

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NEW YORK CITY INFO

Connect with Us

Visit us at 311 Online.
Text us at 311-692.
Call us at 311 or (212) NEW-YORK (212-639-9675) from outside New York City.
Skype us at NYC311.
Contact us using a TTY or Text Telephone at (212) 504-4115.
Follow us on Twitter.
Download our iPhone app.

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FEMA, New York State & New York City Sign Off on 78 Hurricane Sandy Public Assistance Recovery Agreements
Main Content
Release date:
July 27, 2015
Release Number:
NR-012

Agreements Total $9.9 Billion in Recovery Funding Since 2013; Funding Provided Under New Public Assistance Pilot Program

NEW YORK – Today, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, New York State, and New York City announced they have reached final agreements for 78 Public Assistance projects in New York City and Long Island since 2013. The agreements, known as Letters of Undertaking (LOUs), support repair and restoration work totaling $9.9 billion. This includes 33 LOUs for the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) which support $2.9 billion of work at more than 250 buildings.

The funding for these projects was made possible by FEMA’s Public Assistance Alternative Procedures Pilot Program for Permanent Work (Section 428) – a new authority provided by the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013. The pilot program allows FEMA to improve the delivery of public assistance funds by providing financial incentives for timely and cost effective completion of projects. The pilot program also provides FEMA with increased flexibility in the administration of public assistance while streamlining support to state, local, tribal governments or nonprofit groups.

“These agreements are a major step forward in helping our region recover from the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy,” said Region II Administrator, Jerome Hatfield. “This new authority has improved FEMA’s ability to support our state, local and tribal partners as we work together to not only help New York recover from this disaster but also build back safer and stronger than ever before. Our working relationship with New York State and New York City has been invaluable.”

“The vital support provided to New York City through the 428 program is allowing us to rebuild stronger and more resiliently across the five boroughs — from our public housing and hospitals to our boardwalks and open spaces,” said Bill Goldstein, Senior Advisor to Mayor de Blasio for Recovery, Resiliency, and Infrastructure. “The flexibility provided by the program has been a huge help to the City and the New Yorkers who rely on this critical infrastructure. Thank you to FEMA for their continued partnership.”

Some key highlights:

· The 78 LOUs represent an estimated $9.9 billion, with an anticipated $8.9 billion in federal share funding. To date, FEMA has obligated $5.7 billion of its federal share.

· Of the 78 LOUs, 63 represent New York City projects for an estimated $5.9 billion with an anticipated $5.3 billion federal share funding. To date, FEMA has obligated $2.2 billion of the federal share for these NYC projects.

· 33 LOUs pertain to New York City Housing Authority developments and represent an estimated $2.9 billion with an anticipated $2.6 billion in federal share funding. To date, FEMA has obligated $10.2 million of the federal share.

A significant portion of eligible FEMA funding for NYCHA projects will be applied toward mitigation measures to help disaster-damaged buildings better withstand future disasters, including dry flood-proofing of structures and certain utilities, elevating equipment and providing backup power generators to certain damaged facilities.

Traditionally, Public Assistance funding is provided based on estimates and reimbursed at actual cost of completed projects. Under the Alternative Procedures Pilot Program for Permanent Work, eligible applicants may request this fixed cap grant funding for repair, restoration, reconstruction, or replacement of the disaster-damaged facility. The grant amount is capped once FEMA, the State and the applicant agree on the damage, scope of work and estimated cost. Work must be finished within the established time period, including approved time extensions, and managed by the applicant to ensure it is completed for the capped amount. Additional funding is not available if an applicant spends more than the fixed estimate. If the completed project is finished for less than the capped amount, the applicant may use the excess funds for other eligible Public Assistance projects.

The Alternative Procedures Pilot Program for Permanent Work is just one of several Public Assistance initiatives authorized by the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act; more information can be found at FEMA.gov.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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Last Updated:
July 27, 2015 – 12:02

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Formidable Footprint – A Community / Neighborhood Exercise

Description The Formidable Footprint exercise series has been developed in accordance with Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) protocols. The objective of the exercise series is for CERTs, Neighborhood Watch Programs, Neighborhood Associations, Community / Faith Based Organizations, Citizen Corps, Fire Corps and others to work as a team to become better prepared for the next disaster their community may face. There is NO CHARGE for participation in any of the Formidable Footprint exercises. For additional information or to register for up-coming exercises please access the following web site today: www.FormidableFootprint.org

This is a Virtual Event –

Contact Information (Name / Phone / Weblink) Chris Floyd / 850-241-3565 / chrisfloyd@drc-group.com

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Planning for Your Pet in the Event of Disaster
Release Date: October 19, 2011
Release Number: 4020-095

ALBANY, N.Y. – If you are one of the millions of New Yorkers with a cat, dog or other companion animal, now is a good time to start planning for what to do with your pet in the event of disaster.

“It is very important to have a disaster plan for your pets,” said Federal Coordinating Officer Philip E. Parr of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). “Being ready increases the likelihood of survival for you and your pets. It’s best to be prepared.”

FEMA has teamed with the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the American Kennel Club, the American Veterinary Medical Association and the Humane Society of the United States to develop these pet-preparedness guidelines.

Have a pet supply kit ready, including:

Pet food for three days in an airtight, waterproof container and bowls;
Water for three days;
Pet medicines and first aid supplies;
Collar (with ID tags firmly secured), harness or sturdy leash.
Important documents such as registration, adoption papers, vaccination and medical records in a plastic bag or waterproof container;
Travel crate or other pet carrier;
Cat litter, litter box, paper towels, newspapers, plastic trash bags and cleaning supplies;
Photos of you and your pet together for identification purposes;
Familiar items such as toys, treats and blankets.
Plan ahead for your pet:

The single most important thing you can do to protect your pets is to take them in the event that you must evacuate. Animals left behind in a disaster can easily be lost or injured.
If evacuation is necessary, plan ahead where you will go. Consider friends or family outside the area who can take in you and your pet. Other options may include a pet-friendly hotel or motel. If your only evacuation option is a Red Cross or other publicly-run shelter, be aware that not all shelters are equipped or designed to accept non-service animals. Consider boarding your animals at a kennel or veterinary hospital before going to a public shelter.
Plan with neighbors, friends or relatives to evacuate your pet for you if you are unable to do so yourself. Talk with them about your evacuation plans and pet supply kit.
Consult your veterinarian and consider “microchipping” your pet. These permanent implants may be invaluable if you and your pets are separated.
Stay informed about what types of emergencies are likely to affect your region. Be ready to follow instructions from authorities on the scene.
After the disaster:

Don’t allow your pets to roam loose. Familiar landmarks and smells may have been changed by the disaster and your pet could become disoriented or lost.
Be patient with your pets after a disaster. Try to get them back into normal routines as soon as possible and be ready for behavioral problems that may result from the stress of the situation. If behavioral or health problems persist, talk to your vet.
Preparedness can be a lifesaver for you and your pets. Plan ahead and leave no pets behind! For information on pet-friendly accommodations in your area and disaster planning, visit http://www.ready.gov/pets and click on the Pet Preparedness Toolkit link. More information is available at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/animals.shtm.

FEMA’s mission is to support our citizens and first responders to ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

Last Modified: Wednesday, 19-Oct-2011 17:48:51

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WE LEAVE NO STONE UNTURNED WHEN IT COMES TO HELPING OTHERS!!

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