Americans With Disabilities

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES SECTION

Information for specific States/Commonwealths/D.C/Puerto Rico are on their specific pages.

PLEASE READ THIS BEFORE YOU CALL US:

DISCLAIMER

Homeless To Independence Inc. is a 501©3 non-profit organization. We do NOT receive any grant funding what-so-ever to pay bills for anyone in any situation. We do not give away money. We do not give out loans against any money.

This ministry is supported with generous financial donations that are used to help keep us functioning. Our purpose is to help supply individuals and families with personal needs such as food, toiletries, clothing, household items, furniture and baby/adult diapers/wipes both locally and to areas effected by disasters . At this time, we do not offer any shelter or transitional housing services. Again, we DO NOT pay any bills. We DO NOT pay any rents or mortgages.

If you are actually homeless, or about to be homeless or need emergency assistance of any kind, DIAL “211” from a land-line telephone. This will not work from a cell telephone. Tell the receiver your situation and what you need. They will give you information specific for the location you are currently in plus any referrals you may need. They have the most up to the minute information for your specific area. Dialing “211” will get you help and much more info than this office can provide. Homeless to Independence wants you to have all the information you need to get through the situation you are in.

Don’t have a land-line telephone??? Go to your local police department, library, or house of worship and ask to use their land-line telephone. They may even make the call on your behalf.

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For those of you looking for employment through-out the United States, District of Columbia or Puerto Rico, simply send me an email to:

Ann@homelesstoindependence.org with:

1) the name of your State/Commonwealth, District of Columbia or Puerto Rico and
2) if you have a conviction and your record contains something more serious than a traffic conviction within the past 7-years. We do NOT need to know what the conviction was, we do not want to waste your time with opportunities you will not be qualified to apply for at this time.

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Homeless To Independence Inc. is not responsible for misprints or cancellations of events by the event holders, landlord and/or their agent, or ourselves. Homeless to Independence Inc. also reserves the right to “NOT” offer services to people and/or persons that are rude, unpleasant, and untruthful in any way shape or form, belligerent and the like.

OCCASIONALLY, THERE WILL BE ARTICLES BY OTHER WRITERS. HOMELESS TO INDEPENDENCE MAY NOT NECESSARILY AGREE WITH THEIR VIEWPOINTS, BUT WE DO RESPECT THEM. THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION!

OFFICE CONTACT INFO:

HOMELESS TO INDEPENDENCE, INC.
405 SOUTH MAIN ST.
PHILLIPSBURG, NJ 08865

THE VERY BEST WAY TO CONTACT ME IS TO SEND ME AN EMAIL: ANN@HOMELESSTOINDEPENDENCE.ORG

OFFICE NUMBER IS: 1-908-454-1500 LISTEN TO THE RECORDING

Please note that our office does have very limited volunteer staff and if we are one telephone line we cannot answer the other line. There is simply not enough time in the day to answer and/or return each and every telephone call.

IF YOU ARE ASKING FOR FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, NO ONE WILL CONTACT YOU BACK.

THANK YOU!!!

UPDATED 09-25-17
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Disability.GOV information that pertains to individual states are listed on the individual state’s page – Thank you!

and…

Disability.gov’s Guides to Information & Resources

https://www.disability.gov/disability-govs-guides-to-information/

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10-12-17 Northeast ADA Center Weekly eBlast:

                Free Webinar: The Power of Apprenticeship: Including People with DisabilitiesJoin the Northeast ADA Center and Kathleen Lee for a free webinar on October 25th from 12:00pm to 1:30pm EST.Through an injection of new funds, ApprenticeshipUSA is enabling states to partner with job-driven industries to develop innovative strategies to increase apprenticeship opportunities. This webinar will highlight how apprenticeship programs can enable employment service providers who support people with disabilities to foster collaboration with employers to create apprenticeship opportunities in local communities. These partnerships will offer a proven path to good, secure middle-class jobs for people with disabilities who are traditionally underrepresented in these opportunities. We will also discuss how employers might approach providing accommodations for apprentices who have disabilities.

Register for the webinar here: http://register.yangtaninstitute.org/register/index.cfm?event=6402

 — Version en Espanol —

                Webinar Gratuito: El Poder de la Formacion: Como Incluir a las Personas con ImpedimentosÚnase al Centro ADA del Noreste y a Kathleen Lee para un webinar gratuito el 25 de octubre de 12:00pm a 1:30pm EST.Mediante una inyeccion de fondos nuevos, ApprenticeshipUSA esta permitiendo que los estados se unan a industrias impulsadas por empleos para desarrollar estrategias innovadoras y asi aumentar las oportunidades de formacion. Este webinar resaltara como los programas de mentoria pueden permitirles a los proveedores de servicios de empleo que apoyan a las personas con impedimentos a fomentar la colaboracion con patronos para crear oportunidades de formacion en las comunidades locales. Estas alianzas ofreceran un camino probado a buenos empleos y de clase media para personas con impedimentos que tradicionalmente no encuentran estas oportunidades. Tambien discutiremos como los patronos podrian abordar el proveer acomodos para aprendices con impedimentos.

Registrese para el webinar aqui: http://register.yangtaninstitute.org/register/index.cfm?event=6402

POSTED 10-12-17
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Senior Citizens Can Go to College for Free or Cheap in All 50 States
November 2, 2016

by Lisa Rowan

We’re living longer than ever before, and doing so in better health. So what can you do when you retire and want to keep your mind sharp or need to gain additional skills to stay competitive at work?
For many, the answer is to go back to school. But tuition can be prohibitively expensive.
At the same time, schools want their classrooms to be full of engaged students, regardless of age. In the interest of continuing education, many colleges and universities offer reduced or free college tuition to senior citizens (typically, adults 60 and up, although the rules vary).
In fact, we found at least one option in every state!
While some institutions only allow senior students to audit classes, many offer the chance to earn credits toward a degree at a reduced – or completely waived – tuition rate.
Does your state have a continuing education you can use in your golden years? Find out below!

1. Alabama

Alabama seniors can attend any two-year institution within the state completely free.

Adults 60 and older should contact the financial aid office at any community college for admission and eligibility details.
2. Alaska

The University of Alaska waives tuition for senior-citizen residents old enough to receive full social-security benefits. Seniors must wait until the first day of classes to enroll to ensure that there’s space remaining; they must also complete a tuition-waiver form.

Additional costs such as student activity, health center and lab fees are not covered; the student must pay them directly.
3. Arizona

All 10 campuses of Maricopa Community College allow senior citizens to take classes for credit at 50% of the full tuition cost.

Students 65 and older must register between the first and second class sessions of the semester to ensure space is available.
4. Arkansas

Arkansas waives tuition for anyone 60 and over who wants to work toward an undergraduate or graduate degree at state institutions.

Student fees may apply and senior citizens may only register for classes with space available.
5. California
free college courses for senior citizens

California State University waives all tuition and dramatically reduces campus fees for residents age 60 or older.
6. Colorado

Students age 55 and older may attend class on a space-available basis at Colorado State University. There is no tuition fee, but visitors don’t get credit for attending class.

At the University of Colorado Denver, persons aged 60 and above may enroll on a no-credit basis to attend classes as auditors when space is available.

Courses with a lab component are excluded, along with computer courses.
7. Connecticut

Residents 62 and up may attend state colleges, including community colleges, for free.

At Central Connecticut State University, for example, tuition and university fees are waived for any resident over the age of 62 who applies for full- or part-time admission for a degree-granting program.

Senior students may also take non-credit courses on a space-available basis and have tuition waived.
8. Delaware

The University of Delaware, Delaware State University, and Delaware Technical and Community College all permit state residents age 60 or older to audit or take classes for credit for free.

At the University of Delaware, students wishing to use the program must apply for admission on a space-available basis. Some graduate degrees may be eligible, as well.

Participants must pay all related student fees and buy their own textbooks.
9. District of Columbia

Senior citizens 65 and up may audit undergraduate courses from Georgetown University’s School of Continuing Studies. These students pay a fee of $50 per course.
10. Florida
free college courses for senior citizens

The Florida college system waives application, tuition and student fees for those age 60 and above, but colleges will award no credit and will grant admission on a space-available basis.

Fun fact: Florida Atlantic University’s Lifelong Learning Society has the largest adult continuing education program in the U.S. It even has its own auditorium on campus to help serve FAU’s 25,000 new registrants each year.
11. Georgia

Georgia residents age 62 and above may take classes on a space-available basis for free at the state’s public colleges.

Seniors may choose to take classes for credit or continuing education, but they must apply through the regular admissions process at their school of choice.
12. Hawaii

The Senior Citizen Visitor Program at the University of Hawaii and state community colleges allows senior residents to attend courses free of charge, but schools will not award credit nor will they keep permanent records of students’ class history.
13. Idaho

Programs in Idaho vary based on institution, but some schools offer good deals. The College of Southern Idaho offers a Gold Card for students age 60 years and older, which allows them to take non-credit classes tuition-free.

At Boise State University, Idaho residents who are 60 years old can apply, register and pay only $5 per credit hour, along with a $20 registration fee each semester. These same prices also apply at Lewis-Clark State College, but you can only attend part time.
14. Illinois

Upon admission, any senior citizen age 65 and up can attend regular credit courses at Illinois public institutions for free. Lab, student and other fees still apply.
15. Indiana

Retired residents of Indiana age 60 and above can take up to nine credit hours per semester and pay just 50% of in-state tuition fees. Status toward earning a degree is determined by each individual school’s policy.

Indiana University allows senior citizens to register three days before the start of the semester to ensure there is space available.
16. Iowa
free college courses for senior citizens

A few community colleges offer discounts for senior citizens, including Eastern Iowa Community College’s Plus 50 Program, aimed toward adults looking to boost their employment options.
17. Kansas

Kansas residents 60 and older can audit courses at state institutions on a space-available basis without paying tuition or fees.

The registration process varies: the University of Kansas and Wichita State University, for example, both require senior auditors to apply for admission.
18. Kentucky

Tuition and fees are waived for students age 65 and older taking classes on a space-available basis. Residents must be admitted to a state-supported school to take advantage of this discount.
19. Louisiana

Students aged 55 and up attending Louisiana state schools receive free tuition and 50% off books and materials at the campus student bookstore.
20. Maine

Senior citizens 65 and up may attend undergraduate classes as degree-seeking or audit students in the University of Maine System for free, subject to space availability.
21. Maryland

Any student in the University of Maryland System who’s retired and over the age of 60 may have tuition waived, even for degree-granting programs.
22. Massachusetts

Residents age 60 or older can take at least three credits per semester at any state-supported school in Massachusetts and receive free tuition.
23. Michigan

Opportunities for seniors in Michigan vary by institution.

At Michigan Tech, for example, students 60 and older can have tuition waived for up to two courses per semester. Seniors must apply through the admissions office; they do not pay required student fees. Although a school representative said that most seniors taking advantage of this program are not degree-seeking, these credits are eligible to be put toward a degree.

Western Michigan University invites seniors 62 and older to audit one class per semester after submitting a non-degree application.

Seniors 60 and up receive free tuition at Northern Michigan University; at Wayne State University in Detroit, seniors 60 and up receive a 75% discount on tuition, but must pay registration and related fees.
24. Minnesota
free college courses for senior citizens

Minnesota waives tuition for senior citizens 62 and older, but fees may vary by school. At the University of Minnesota, seniors pay a $10 fee per credit, but can audit for free.
25. Mississippi

There’s no statewide benefit in Mississippi, but some schools have programs for seniors. Mississippi State University provides a waiver for residents age 60 or older, but only for two courses per semester where space is available.

University of Mississippi’s Office of Professional Development and Lifelong Learning allows seniors 65 and older to take one class per semester at any UM campus.
26. Missouri

Missouri residents age 65 and older are exempt from paying tuition at state-supported institutions for classes attended on non-credit basis. Schools may require a registration fee of up to $25 per semester.
27. Montana

The Montana University System offers a tuition waiver for in-state residents 65 years of age or older. Campus and registration fees are not waived.
28. Nebraska

Several Nebraska colleges offer waivers to senior citizens. Chadron College allows adults 65 and up to audit one course per semester for free. Senior women can audit one class per semester for free at the College of St. Mary in Omaha.

At Mid-Plains Community College, seniors 62 and older pay 35% of the normal tuition rate.
29. Nevada

The University of Nevada – Las Vegas allows seniors 62 and up to take fall and spring courses free of charge. They pay 50% tuition for summer classes. Lab and other course fees are not covered.
30. New Hampshire

University of New Hampshire offers residents 65 and older free tuition for two credit-bearing classes per semester on a space-available basis, so long as they’re not enrolled in a degree program.

Seniors can take one undergraduate or graduate course per semester for free at Plymouth State University.
31. New Jersey

Senior citizens 65 and older may enroll at public colleges in New Jersey on a space-available basis. Fees still apply for these students, whether auditing or studying for credit.

Rutgers University allows retired New Jersey residents 62 and older to audit courses for free in the spring and fall semesters.
32. New Mexico
free college courses for senior citizens

New Mexico offers reduced tuition of just of $5 per credit hour to state residents 65 and older.

For-credit classes are eligible as well as auditing; senior citizens can take no more than six credit hours per semester. The program is offered on a space-available basis and students are responsible for paying any additional course fees.
33. New York

Many schools offer free or reduced tuition for senior citizens. Queens College allows residents 60 and up to audit any course after completing a Senior Citizen Auditor Application and paying $80 per semester.

At SUNY Purchase, senior citizens 60 and older must register in person to audit classes that have space available; they pay a $50 audit fee.
34. North Carolina

Tuition is waived for senior citizens attending North Carolina community colleges. Audit options may be available at other schools.

At The University of North Carolina-Wilmington, for example, senior citizens may audit classes for free after paying a $75 application fee.
35. North Dakota

Programs vary by institution in North Dakota. At Bismarck State, for example, senior citizens 65 and older can audit courses tuition-free, but are still responsible for other course fees. The same rule applies for Lake Region State College.
36. Ohio

Ohio residents at least 60 years old may attend class at any state college for free. Senior-citizen students do not receive credit and can only register on a space-available basis.
37. Oklahoma

Oklahoma state colleges and universities waive tuition for senior citizens 65+ who wish to audit classes.
38. Oregon

Oregon State University allows senior citizens to audit classes for free.

The University of Oregon also waives fees for seniors 65 and older auditing classes on a space-available basis.
39. Pennsylvania

Clarion University offers an audit-fee waiver for residents 62 and up. At Bloomsburg University, you only need to be 60 to audit classes for free on a space-available basis.

There can be additional benefits at the community college level: Bucks County Community College, for example, waives for-credit course tuition for seniors 65 and up so long as they register after students paying full tuition.
40. Rhode Island

Senior citizens over 60 may request a tuition waiver at the University of Rhode Island, Rhode Island College or the Community College of Rhode Island to attend classes with space available.

Interested persons must submit a Senior Citizen Means Test to verify they are of limited income. A FAFSA is required for all degree-seeking senior students.
41. South Carolina

Residents 60 and above can attend classes at state schools on a credit or noncredit basis, pending space available, for free. The school must grant admission via its normal procedures.

Technology, lab and other fees are the responsibility of the student.
42. South Dakota

Residents 65 and older can attend public universities in South Dakota at 25% of the normal cost of tuition for undergraduate or graduate courses.

Interested adults should apply through the regular admissions system and the school will automatically grant the discount upon admission. Student fees are not waived.
43. Tennessee

Tennessee residents 65 and older may enroll in courses for credit at state schools and community colleges.

Schools may charge a service fee of up to $70 per semester that goes toward the keeping of records for those students.
44. Texas

Texas law allows students 65 and up the opportunity to take six credit hours of undergraduate or graduate courses for free at public universities.

A senior citizen attending the University of Texas at Austin, for example, could earn a degree for free if they only take six credit hours per semester and maintain a 2.0 GPA.

Students must present proof of age to the accounts receivable office to have the exemption applied to their accounts.
45. Utah

Residents age 62 and up may enroll tuition-free at a state institution; a registration fee is required.

At the University of Utah, for example, seniors can audit most classes on a space-available basis and only have to pay a fee of $25 per semester.
46. Vermont
free college courses for senior citizens

Until 2016, Vermonters over the age of 65 could take two non-credit classes per semester for free in the Vermont State College system, including community colleges.

Now, anyone 60 and older must pay half tuition for classes, and they will receive credit.
47. Virginia

Although the state law regarding free higher education for senior citizens earning taxable income of less than $23,850 per year was repealed in 2016, some schools still offer tuition-free registration for senior citizens.

For instance, senior citizens 60 and above who wish to audit or take classes for credit at William & Mary must enroll at least one week before the start of the semester but may register for courses on the first day classes begin.
48. Washington

Institutions in Washington are required to partially or fully waive tuition fees for residents age 60 or older who are enrolled for credit on a space-available basis. Nominal fees may apply to students auditing courses.

Some schools limit senior citizens to a certain number of classes or credits; for example, Washington State University caps the waiver at six credits in each of fall and spring semesters. Other schools may only offer tuition-free audit options.
49. West Virginia

West Virginia allows residents age 65 and older to attend undergraduate and graduate courses on a space-available basis; both for-credit and audit options are available. Schools may still require seniors to pay fees such as parking.

While senior students at West Virginia University applying for credit must use the regular admissions form, those wishing to be non-degree students pay just $5 to apply.
50. Wisconsin

Adults 60 and up may audit classes at any University of Wisconsin campus for free, where space is available.
51. Wyoming

Upon admission to the University of Wyoming, senior citizens 65 and up may attend class on a space-available basis for free.

Community colleges offer a tuition-waiver form seniors can submit; the waivers do not cover student or other fees.
Another Continuing Education Option

More than 100 colleges and universities around the country offer another continuing education program for senior citizens: enrichment courses through the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI).

Prices vary depending upon the institution; some have an annual fee, like the University of Minnesota’s basic membership of $210 per year. Other schools charge a class-based fee; Duke University has a $35 annual membership fee, and then charges $20 to $90 per class.

OLLI classes don’t count toward a degree, but if you’re looking for personal development opportunities among older adults, these courses can provide opportunities that mix in the campus experience, too.

Your Turn: Did you go back to school after retirement? What discounts did your college offer to senior citizens?

Lisa Rowan is a writer and producer at The Penny Hoarder. Editorial intern Jacquelyn Pica contributed to this post.

FOR THE FULL ARTICLE:

http://www.thepennyhoarder.com/free-college-courses-for-senior-citizens/#utm_source=Newsletter1104&utm_medium=email&utm_content=collegesenior

POSTED 11-07-16
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Where Can Employers Find Help Recruiting and Hiring People with Disabilities?

Where Can Employers Find Help Recruiting and Hiring People with Disabilities?

POSTED 05-17-16
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Closed Captioning to Be Available on Some Airline In-Flight Entertainment Systems

Passengers who are deaf or hard of hearing will soon be able to use closed captioning on videos and other in-flight entertainment on some airlines. The National Association of the Deaf and Gogo LLC have reached an agreement to make closed captioning available for all programming streamed through Gogo’s in-flight entertainment service, Gogo Vision. The service will be available by June 30, 2017 on airlines that offer Gogo Vision services.

LINK: http://nad.org/news/2016/1/nad-and-gogo-llc-agree-make-closed-captions-available-flight-entertainment-systems

POSTED 01-29-16

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10 Things Parents of Children with Developmental Disabilities Should Know

Disability Connection Newsletter – June 2015

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The Arc Launches TalentScout – Guide for Employers on How to Successfully Employ People with Autism
The Arc Launches TalentScout – Guide for Employers on How to Successfully Employ People with Autism

Posted 04-24-15
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Disability.gov Update: Social Security Expanding Field Office Hours Nationwide Effective March 2015
Disability gov Update Social Security Expanding Field Office Hours Nationwide

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New Guest Blog: Living a Healthier Life: A Report by AbilityPath Provides Tips for “Finding Balance”
New Guest Blog Living a Healthier Life A Report by AbilityPath Provides Tips for Finding Balance 01-26

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Millions in Rental Assistance Awarded to Help People with Disabilities Find Permanent, Affordable Housing

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is awarding $150 million in rental assistance funding to 25 State Housing Agencies. The agencies will use the money to provide permanent, affordable rental housing and supportive services to people with disabilities who have very low incomes. The funding will prevent thousands of individuals with disabilities from being institutionalized or becoming homeless. HUD’s support is made possible through the Section 811 Project Rental Assistance program.

Read Disability.gov’s Guide to Housing for more housing information, including help paying for home modifications, rental assistance programs, supportive housing and organizations in your state that can help you find an affordable place to live.

Link to page is: http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/press/press_releases_media_advisories/2015/HUDNo_15-026

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Labor Department Partners with Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers Society to Promote Employment of People with Disabilities
Disabaility & Labor Dept

Posted 05-21-14

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Back to School: Teaching Kids How to Handle Bullying
Back to School Teaching Kids How to Handle Bullying

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Disability Connection: 10 Things You Need to Know for Back-to-School
Disability

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Accommodation and Compliance Series:
Alternative Input Devices

By Elisabeth Simpson, M.S.

Preface
More Sharing ServicesShare
Introduction

Individuals may have limitations that interfere with the ability to access computers. Traditionally, a computer user accesses a computer with a standard point and click mouse and an external QWERTY keyboard (named for the top left-hand side of the rows). Individuals with physical and/or developmental limitations may not be able to use these standard computer input devices effectively so may benefit from using alternatives. Standard keyboards are made for typists who use two hands and ten fingers; alternative input devices are made for computer users with a variety of limitations, including individuals with no hand or finger movement. Individuals with these limitations may benefit from alternative input devices if they have tremors or spasticity, lack of coordination, loss of vision, paralysis or numbness, and/or a decline in cognitive function.

Alternative input devices are hardware or software solutions that allow users with a variety of impairments to access a computer in a different way. These devices come in many shapes and sizes to accommodate a variety of limitations. Generally we access a computer using a standard keyboard and mouse. Alternative input devices allow the user to access a computer in whatever way works best for them such as using his/her feet, head, eye, mouth, breath, thumb, or a single finger. Some devices are activated by motion while others can be controlled with nerve or muscle signals, optical tracking, even brain activity and mind energy.

In recent years, with the advent of tablet devices and touch screen PCs, we have seen a shift in how products are being developed and how “traditional” input devices are often not part of the package. However, many of the features discussed in this publication are available on tablet devices right out of the box; they just have to be turned on. Text-to-speech is just one example of a built-in accessibility feature that some tablet devices offer. Accessories are available that offer key guards for the onscreen keyboard, external large print or color contrast keyboards are available, and devices can be configured to be switch accessible.

This publication is a non-inclusive list of alternative computer input devices typically used by individuals with upper and lower extremity limitations. If you would like additional information contact the Job Accommodation Network (JAN) directly. JAN also has information on alternative input devices designed specifically to accommodate individuals with cognitive and sensory impairments.
Software and Onboard Features

Software programs that assist people who use alternative input devices are available. Some software actually comes imbedded in computer operating systems. Most new versions of operating systems have accessibility options that make the keyboard easier to use. Keyboard shortcuts or Sticky Keys let the user press a shortcut, such as Shift, Ctrl, or Alt and have it remain active until another key is pressed. Filter Keys, such as Bounce Keys, can be set so that brief or repeated keystrokes are ignored. Mouse Keys allow the user to move the mouse around the screen by using the numeric keypad. For additional information on your operating system’s features, visit the operating system’s homepage or access the system’s help feature.

On-screen keyboards, sometimes called keyboard emulators, are software programs that display virtual keyboards on computer screens. A user can then “type” data using an alternative input device, such as a mouse. Newer versions of computers come with on-screen keyboard options, which have basic capabilities.

With Word prediction software the user can start typing a word, the application will interpret what is being typed, and a list of suggested words will be provided. This software also displays a menu of words that typically follow the word just typed. Word completion software displays sample words after typing part of a word. Macro software allows users to complete several steps of a task in a few programmed keystrokes. Often these software programs are packaged together.

Morse code software is based on a modified military Morse code, which involves a system where dots and dashes are combined to form codes representing all the characters on the keyboard. Morse code software is offered as freeware or bundled with input devices such as switches. For additional information use a search engine such as Yahoo! to locate Morse code freeware.

Many products have built-in word prediction features, onscreen keyboards, and speech recognition. Tablets and smart technology also uses onscreen keyboards and there are various options for keyboard lay out with these products. When using a tablet, a user can “split” the keyboard so that the keys are split on either side of the screen. This might be easier or more comfortable for some people to use.

Touch screens can be built into computers or they can be devices that are placed on the computer monitor that allows the user to control the computer with direct pen-on-screen input. If an individual cannot use a keyboard and/or mouse but is able to use a stylus, a mouthstick, or their finger to input information, converting a monitor might be an option to consider.
Use of Hands and Feet

Among the alternative computer input devices that can be operated by hands and fingers are alternative/ergonomic, miniature, expanded, and one-handed keyboards; switches; handwritten entry, touch screens, and pen systems; scanners; and alternative mice (touchpads, joysticks, and trackballs). For information on these products visit JAN’s Searchable Online Accommodation Resource (SOAR).

Alternative keyboards, sometimes called ergonomic keyboards, can be used by individuals with various impairments but are especially beneficial to individuals who experience pain and fatigue when keyboarding. Alternative keyboards come in many sizes and shapes: fixed split keyboards, adjustable split, or contoured. Many increase typing comfort, such as light touch, touch-free, or virtual keyboards. Several can be positioned to accommodate individual preferences, including negative and positive tilt adjustments.

Alternative mice are variations of “traditional” click and point mice. An alternative mouse is usually designed to help accommodate individuals with various fine motor limitations, spasticity, or other gripping limitations. For example, an individual who cannot grip a traditional mouse due to arthritis, carpal tunnel, or a hand injury may be able to move a cursor effectively with a glidepoint, trackball, or joystick.

Expanded keyboards are typically flat, smooth, and have larger keys (i.e., one-inch square); most have a clear Mylar cover and many are waterproof.

Pen tablet systems, handwritten entry, and touch screens allow users to control computers with direct pen-on-screen input and fingertip-on-screen control.

Miniature keyboards vary in size and are smaller than “traditional” QWERTY keyboards. Keys are closely spaced for easy access, and the keyboard surface is very sensitive to touch.

One-handed keyboards and software assist individuals with no or limited use of one hand in entering data into a computer by allowing more convenient “one-handed” entry and control.

Scanners, sometimes called optical character recognition (OCR) technology, allow individuals to scan printed text and save it to a computer.

Switches connect to an external device, such as a computer or tablet, and when activated the user is able to access the device with a click of the switch. Switches can be activated by any part of the body and most are activated by pressure. Some switches require little to no pressure to be activated and some can be activated by gesturing. Switches come in all sizes, shapes, and colors, can be mounted anywhere, and can be interfaced so that an individual can have access to multiple devices.

Ten keypads are separated from a keyboard and give the numeric layout of a standard desktop keyboard or ten key. These movable keypads are small and can be used left or right handed on your desktop or laptop computer.
Use of Speech

Speech recognition allows individuals to access the computer by using their voice. It can be very useful for those with physical impairments who have difficulty using a keyboard or for those with cognitive or intellectual impairments who have difficulty with writing and documentation. The speech recognition software is “trained” to recognize a user’s commands, i.e., “open,” “enter,” and “close.” The technology has several components: noise-canceling input, a speech recognition engine, vocabularies, application interfaces, text-to-speech for proofreading, and prompts for format corrections. Many newer computers have basic speech recognition built into the operating system. The software available ranges from basic dictation to occupation specific products. Visit “Speech Recognition: Options to Consider” for additional information on speech recognition software.
Use of Head

A head tracking device is a type of alternative input device that allows an individual to control the computer by moving their head. A camera that is mounted on the computer tracks a small dot that can be placed anywhere on the users head-even on glasses or a hat. Keys or commands are engaged when the individual dwells over a spot on the screen for a certain length of time. For information on alternative input devices that are controlled by the head, visit JAN’s SOAR for Head Controlled Alternative Computer Input Devices.
Use of Breath and Mouth

Alternative input devices can be controlled by the user’s breath and mouth. The user controls the mouthpiece or mouse stick with the movement of their lips and engages the mouse clicks by sipping and puffing through the mouthpiece, similar to what someone would do when using a straw.For information on alternative input devices that are controlled using breath and mouth, visit JAN’s SOAR for Breath and Mouth Controlled Alternative Computer Input Devices.
Use of Eyes

Eyegaze technology enables an individual to access a device by using only eyes. Video cameras are used to detect and observe eye movement. Some systems do not even require the user to wear anything on their head. The individual can navigate a computer screen or operate some other device by looking at keys on a control screen. The keys are activated when the user has looked at the key for a specified amount of time. For information on alternative input devices that are controlled using the eyes, visit JAN’s SOAR for Eye Controlled Alternative Computer Input Devices.
Use of Feet

For information on alternative input devices that are controlled using the feet, visit JAN’s SOAR for Feet Controlled Alternative Computer Input Devices.
Environmental Control Units

Environmental control units (ECUs), which enable users to turn off and on lights and appliances, adjust thermostats, control switch operated battery-powered devices, and control computer equipment, are also available. Environmental control accessories such as audio visual equipment controls, bed controls, and signal controls are available. Many are operated by remote controls or are controlled by the user’s voice, by touch buttons, and by timers.

Updated 06/17/13

ASK A JAN CONSULTANT

JAN provides free, confidential technical assistance about job accommodations and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

(800)526-7234 (Voice)
(877)781-9403 (TTY)

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Accommodation and Compliance Series:
Job Coaching in the Workplace

By Daniel Tucker, M.S., & Jim Womeldorff, M.S.

Preface

Introduction
Information About
Americans with Disabilities Act
Accommodating Employees
Resources
References

PDF Version Word Version
Introduction

JAN’s Accommodation and Compliance Series is designed to help employers determine effective accommodations and comply with title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Each publication in the series addresses a specific medical condition or topic and provides information about the condition or topic, ADA information, accommodation ideas, and resources for additional information.
The Accommodation and Compliance Series is a starting point in the accommodation process and may not address every situation. Accommodations should be made on a case by case basis, considering each employee’s individual limitations and accommodation needs. Employers are encouraged to contact JAN to discuss specific situations in more detail.
For information on assistive technology and other accommodation ideas, visit JAN’s Searchable Online Accommodation Resource (SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar.
Information about Job Coaches
What are job coaches and what do they do?

Job coaches are individuals who specialize in assisting individuals with disabilities to learn and accurately carry out job duties. Job coaches provide one-on-one training tailored to the needs of the employee. They may first do a job analysis to identify the job duties, followed by developing a specific plan as to how they can best train the employee to work more and more on his/her own until completely self-sufficient and able to perform job duties accurately and effectively without assistance.

Job coaching is sometimes done in a relatively informal way, but it can also involve the application of the evidence-based practice of “supported employment.” Job coaches can also work with employers to explore unmet business needs so that jobs can be developed or customized. Support (to the employee and employer) in addition to skills training can consist of advocacy, disability awareness-building, job adaptations, social support, problem-solving, and the development of natural supports to allow the job coach to phase out of direct involvement (Beyer and Robinson, 2009).
Who uses job coaches?

While job coaches can be helpful in assisting individuals with a wide variety of disabilities, job coaches most commonly work with individuals who have conditions such as autism, learning disabilities, attention deficit disorder (ADD), and cognitive impairments. Job coaching is also one of the most frequently used accommodations by people with psychiatric disabilities (MacDonald-Wilson, Lin, & Farkas, 2011).
Where can employers find job coaches?

Most state vocational rehabilitation agencies employ job coaches, have job coaching as part of their vocational rehabilitation counselors’ roles or, more commonly, refer their clients to (or contract with) various non-profit organizations that provide job coaching. Types of these organizations vary among communities, but can include Arcs (and other service provider agencies for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities), community mental health providers, supported employment agencies and programs, transitional employment programs, community rehabilitation programs/providers and Goodwill Industries’ vocational programs. Organizations like the Epilepsy Foundation of America, the Autism Society of America, and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society also can be sources of job coaches for people with specific disabilities.
Who provides funding for job coaches?

Often, the state vocational rehabilitation agency pays the job coaching provider for clients it refers. Sometimes job coaching is funded by a managed care organization on a fee-for-service basis. Also, provider agencies and other entities sometimes fund job coaching with vocationally-focused grants such as the job-readiness grants from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation.

It is less typical for employers to directly pay for a job coaching service, but they may be required to consider whether they can provide funding for a job coach as a reasonable accommodation under the ADA, absent undue hardship, if no other funding options are available. However, paying for a temporary job coach is not typically that costly. A recent research review (conducted by the University of Maryland for the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation at Boston University) found that accommodations for people with psychiatric disabilities often involve supports provided by job coaches and tend to cost little to nothing (MacDonald-Wilson, Lin, & Farkas, 2011).
Job Coaches and the Americans with Disabilities Act
Does the ADA require employers to provide job coaches?

Title I of the ADA requires employers with 15 or more employees to consider providing reasonable accommodation for employees who meet the Act’s definition of disability. A reasonable accommodation is a modification or adjustment to a job that enables a qualified individual with a disability to enjoy equal employment opportunities. Reasonable accommodation can include job coaches in the form of personalized training.

According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), an employer may be required to provide a temporary job coach to assist in the training of a qualified individual with a disability as a reasonable accommodation, barring undue hardship. An employer also may be required to allow a job coach paid by a public or private social service agency to accompany the employee at the job site as a reasonable accommodation (EEOC, 1997).
When might an employer have to provide a job coach under the ADA?

According to the EEOC, an employer might have to consider a job coach to assist an employee to learn how to do a job; provide intensive monitoring, training, assessment, and support; help develop healthy working relationships by encouraging appropriate social interaction and maintaining open communications; and assist the parties in determining what reasonable accommodation is needed (EEOC, n.d.).
Accommodating Employees Using Job Coaches

(Note: People use job coaches for a variety of reasons, so their accommodation needs will vary. The following is only a sample of the accommodation possibilities available. Numerous other accommodation solutions may exist.)
Questions to Consider:

What limitations is the employee experiencing?
How do these limitations affect the employee and the employee’s job performance?
What specific job tasks are problematic as a result of these limitations?
What accommodations are available to reduce or eliminate these problems? Are all possible resources being used to determine possible accommodations?
Has the employee been consulted regarding possible accommodations?
Once accommodations are in place, would it be useful to meet with the employee to evaluate the effectiveness of the accommodations and to determine whether additional accommodations are needed?
Do supervisory personnel and employees need training regarding job coaches?

Accommodation Ideas and Situations and Solutions:

Learning the Job:
Some employees may need more assistance learning a new job than an employer is able to provide. In such cases, a temporary job coach can provide the additional training that is needed.

Situation: A grocery store chain recently hired a customer care clerk who has Down Syndrome. The new clerk’s job duties require her to be able to quickly group similar items together when bagging customer purchases. Due to her disability, she has difficulty recognizing which products are similar, but can remember such relationships once they are pointed out to her. The employer does not have anyone available to spend the required time to train the clerk.

Solution: The employer hired a job coach to show the clerk how to match items when bagging products. After about two weeks, the clerk was able to perform the job independently so the job coach was no longer needed.

Providing Monitoring and Support:
In addition to helping employees learn a new job, a job coach can provide one-on-one monitoring and support until the employee has mastered job duties or overcome other work-related issues.

Situation: A janitor at a furniture factory has a cognitive disability. His primary essential function is to sweep away the ever-accumulating sawdust, which he does very well. However, once he has performed a complete sweep of the floor, he has difficulty determining when it needs to be done again. This results in the sawdust becoming a barrier to other workers’ mobility.

Solution: The employee is a client of state vocational rehabilitation (VR) and his vocational rehabilitation counselor arranges for a job coach to help address the problem. After monitoring the employee’s work and helping him learn to discriminate between a clean floor and one that is ready to be swept again, the job coach is able to fade out his direct involvement, but remains available to support the employee as needed.

Encouraging Appropriate Social Interaction:
In some cases, people with disabilities may be starting their first jobs and may have difficulty interacting with coworkers or management. Job coaches can often help these employees develop appropriate workplace social skills.

Situation: A food service worker with an anxiety disorder works in the kitchen of a restaurant, helping with food preparation and cleaning. She is able to perform all of her essential functions, but she tends to talk to her co-workers incessantly about her personal issues to the point that other employees complain to management. A manager talks with the food service worker about her conduct and explains that it is interfering with work and making coworkers uncomfortable.

Solution: The employee is a client of a mental health agency and offers to talk with her service coordinator about getting a job coach. The job coach teaches the employee how to talk with coworkers about impersonal topics (like the weather) and how to focus conversations on work tasks she and coworkers are performing. The job coach then helps the employee apply the new skills directly on the job and is able to fade out direct involvement after a couple of months.

Helping with Accommodations:
A job coach often can be a useful resource to help come up with accommodation ideas and for testing ideas until effective accommodations can be identified and implemented.

Situation: A veteran who recently returned to the workforce after spending several years overseas has Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), which causes difficulty with memory and mood regulation. He was recently hired as a customer service representative. After disclosing his disability and requesting reasonable accommodations, his employer provided him with a cubicle close to an exit, with his back facing a wall. This helped to alleviate some of his stress, but he still had difficulty with memory and emotional outbursts.

Solution: The employer obtained a job coach through the Department of Veterans Affairs to assist the employee with adjusting to his new position. The job coach worked with the employer and employee to develop a customized form for taking notes from customers and a system for organizing the employee’s workspace. The job coach also suggested the employee e-mail his supervisor when he has questions so he will have responses in written form that he can refer to later if he forgets something. Finally, the job coach helped the employee incorporate breaks into his day to walk and do breathing exercises to help reduce the likelihood of emotional outbursts. After the job coach comes in twice a week for three weeks, the employee is able to incorporate the job coach’s suggestions into his regular routine and perform his job duties without assistance.

Resources
References

Government of the United Kingdom, Department of Health. (2011). Valuing People Now – Employment. Supported employment and job coaching: best practice guidelines. Retrieved from British Association for Supported Employment website: http://base-uk.org/sites/base-uk.org/files/[user-raw]/11-06/supported_employment_and_job_coaching-_best_practice_guide….pdf
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (1997). EEOC enforcement guidance on the Americans with Disabilities Act and psychiatric disabilities. Retrieved from http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/psych.html
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (n.d.). Questions and answers about persons with intellectual disabilities in the workplace and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Retrieved from http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/intellectual_disabilities.cfm
MacDonald-Wilson, K., Lin, C. H., & Farkas, M. (2011). Synthesis of the research literature on job accommodations for people with psychiatric disabilities 1990-2010 (Research Syntheses). Retrieved from Boston University Center for Psychiatric Rehabilitation website: http://www.bu.edu/drrk/research-syntheses/psychiatric-disabilities/job-accommodations

Updated 06/18/2013

ASK A JAN CONSULTANT

JAN provides free, confidential technical assistance about job accommodations and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).
(800)526-7234 (Voice)
(877)781-9403 (TTY)

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This information has recently been updated, and is now available.

Disabilitygov: Senior VP CJ Lange Guest Blogs: 3 Tips for Increasing Employment Opportunities for People with Disabilities http://t.co/tyyq6xIDAA
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Disability.gov Update: HUD & HHS Partner to Provide Housing & Services to Low-Income People with Disabilities
Disability.gov sent this bulletin at 02/14/2013 08:02 AM EST

HUD & HHS Partner to Provide Housing & Services to Low-Income People with Disabilities

The U.S. departments of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Health and Human Services (HHS) have contributed nearly $98 million in funding to 13 state housing agencies so they can provide rental assistance for low-income people with disabilities. The funding will help prevent homelessness and placement of people in institutions. The funding comes from the Section 811 Project Rental Assistance Demonstration Program, which makes it possible for low-income people with disabilities to live in integrated settings instead of nursing homes.

Visit Disability.gov for more housing assistance resources, including information about where to find help with modifications to make your home accessible.

GO TO: http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2013pres/02/20130212b.html

Posted 02-16-13

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New Online Training Video on Increasing Federal Government Hiring of People with Disabilities

This online training from the Computer/Electronic Accommodations Program (CAP) provides information for federal government hiring managers on recruiting, hiring and retaining people with disabilities. The training provides information about accommodations and assistive technologies that can help people with a broad range of disabilities perform the essential functions of their jobs. You’ll also learn about Administration efforts to increase the employment of people with disabilities in the Federal Government.

GO TO: http://cap.mil/NewsEvents/TrainingVideo.aspx?id=1

Posted 02-16-13

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U.S. Department of Education Clarifies Schools’ Obligation to Provide Equal Opportunity to Students with Disabilities to Participate in Extracurricular Athletics
January 25, 2013

Contact:
Press Office, (202) 401-1576, press@ed.gov

Today, the Department’s Office for Civil Rights issued guidance clarifying school districts’ existing legal obligations to provide equal access to extracurricular athletic activities to students with disabilities. In addition to explaining those legal obligations, the guidance urges school districts to work with community organizations to increase athletic opportunities for students with disabilities, such as opportunities outside of the existing extracurricular athletic program.

Students with disabilities have the right, under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, to an equal opportunity to participate in their schools’ extracurricular activities. A 2010 report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office found that many students with disabilities are not afforded an equal opportunity to participate in athletics, and therefore may not have equitable access to the health and social benefits of athletic participation.

“Sports can provide invaluable lessons in discipline, selflessness, passion and courage, and this guidance will help schools ensure that students with disabilities have an equal opportunity to benefit from the life lessons they can learn on the playing field or on the court,” said Education Secretary Arne Duncan.

The guidance letter provides examples of the types of reasonable modifications that schools may be required to make to existing policies, practices, or procedures for students with intellectual, developmental, physical, or any other type of disability. Examples of such modifications include:

The allowance of a visual cue alongside a starter pistol to allow a student with a hearing impairment who is fast enough to qualify for the track team the opportunity to compete.
The waiver of a rule requiring the “two-hand touch” finish in swim events so that a one-armed swimmer with the requisite ability can participate at swim meets.

The guidance also notes that the law does not require that a student with a disability be allowed to participate in any selective or competitive program offered by a school district, so long as the selection or competition criteria are not discriminatory.

“Participation in extracurricular athletics can be a critical part of a student’s overall educational experience, said Seth Galanter, acting assistant secretary for the Office for Civil Rights (OCR). “Schools must ensure equal access to that rewarding experience for students with disabilities.”

The mission of the Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) is to ensure equal access to education and to promote educational excellence throughout the nation through the vigorous enforcement of civil rights. Among the federal civil rights laws OCR is responsible for enforcing are Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; Title IX of the Education Amendment Act of 1972; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973; and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. For more information about the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights and the anti-discrimination statutes that it enforces, please visit OCR’s website at http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/aboutocr.html and follow OCR on twitter @EDcivilrights.

Posted 01-28-13

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Assistive Technology for Infants, Toddlers & Young Children with Disabilities
Information for parents about the benefits of assistive technology for infants, toddlers and young children with disabilities. There are two types of assistive technology devices most commonly used by infants and toddlers–switches and augmentative communication devices.

all7

Posted 12-29-12

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Tax Help for People with Disabilities
Managing Agency U.S. Department of the Treasury http://www.ustreas.gov/

Program Description
The program provides tax relief for disabled individual taxpayers.

General Program Requirements
In order to qualify for this benefit program, you or a member of your household must be disabled. You must also be a taxpayer who is interested in receiving tax information and tax return preparation assistance.

Your Next Steps
The following information will lead you to the next steps to apply for this benefit.

Application Process
No application is needed to utilize this program. However, you must file your taxes using the guidelines posted at http://www.irs.gov/publications/p907/ar02.html.

Program Contact Information
For more information, visit:
http://www.irs.gov/uac/Tax-Benefits-for-Education:-Information-Center

Or contact your local Taxpayer Assistance Center:
http://www.irs.gov/localcontacts/index.html

For additional information contact:
IRS Tax Forms & Publications
SE:W:CAR:MP:FP, IR-6526
1111 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, DC 20224

Updated 12-04-12

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What to Do with Side Effects of Medications

All medications can have side effects, but there may be ways to work around them so that you can still take them as prescribed. Use this chart (chart is the link below) from the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance to find common side effects that some drugs can have and ways to cope with them.

medications

Posted 11-15-12

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Disability.gov Update: Disaster Distress Resources & Helpline – 1-800-985-5990
Disability.gov sent this bulletin at 11/08/2012 05:41 PM EST
Disaster Distress Resources & Helpline – 1-800-985-5990

Tips for coping and other resources for people who may be feeling overwhelmed following natural disasters or other events. If you’re feeling stressed, anxious or depressed, call 1-800-985-5990 (1-800-846-8517 (TTY) for people who are deaf or hard of hearing) to speak with a crisis counselor 24/7, or text TalkWithUs to 66746. Download the wallet card, “Having Trouble Coping After a Disaster? Talk with Us.”

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10 Basic Steps in Special Education

10 Basic Steps in Special Education

Posted 09-11-12

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Department of Aging Announces New Customer Service Line

The Pennsylvania Department of Aging has announced a new toll-free number to help consumers with questions about long-term care and services for people with disabilities. The Link to Aging and Disability Resource Center line, 1-800-753-8827, is answered Monday through Friday, except holidays, between 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

POSTED 07-15-12

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More than 16 million people with Medicare get free preventive services in 2012

Affordable Care Act made many preventive services no cost to beneficiaries

The Affordable Care Act – the new health care law – helped over 16 million people with original Medicare get at least one preventive service at no cost to them during the first six months of 2012, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced today. This includes 1.35 million who have taken advantage of the Annual Wellness Visit provided by the Affordable Care Act. In 2011, 32.5 million people in Medicare received one or more preventive benefits free of charge.

“Millions of Americans are getting cancer screenings, mammograms and other preventive services for free thanks to the health care law,” said Secretary Sebelius. “These new benefits, made possible through the health care law, are helping people stay healthy by giving them the tools they need to prevent health problems before they happen.”

Prior to 2011, people with Medicare faced cost-sharing for many preventive benefits such as cancer screenings. Through the Affordable Care Act, preventive benefits are offered free of charge to beneficiaries, with no deductible or co-pay, so that cost is no longer a barrier for seniors who want to stay healthy and treat problems early.

The law also added an important new service for people with Medicare — an Annual Wellness Visit with the doctor of their choice— at no cost to beneficiaries.

For more information on Medicare-covered preventive services, please visit: http://www.healthcare.gov/law/features/65-older/medicare-preventive-services/index.html

To learn what screenings, vaccinations and other preventive services doctors recommend for you and those you care about, please visit the myhealthfinder tool at www.healthfinder.gov.

Posted 07-15-12

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The Social Security Administration provides long-term disability benefits to U.S. workers who are unable to work for more than 12 months due to a physical, mental or emotional medical condition.

Although evaluating each case might take several months or even years, Social Security can fast-track the process for some cases if they fall under its Compassionate Allowances Program.

Learn more about the Social Security Compassionate Allowances Program:

GO TO: http://blog.usa.gov/post/24194295514/how-to-get-quick-approval-for-certain-disability-claims

Posted 06-07-12

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Long Term Care & Independent Living Resources

Find information about long term care services and supports in your state. Centers for Independent Living, Area Offices on Aging and many other organizations help older adults and people with disabilities live independently in their communities. They also provide information about benefit programs and other financial assistance, transportation, help finding housing and resources for caregivers.

Visit Disability.gov for information about other health and independent living topics, including home health care, Medicare, Medicaid and help paying for prescription drugs. Visit Disability.Blog for more news and stories about people with disabilities as active participants in their communities and in the workplace.

GO TO: http://www.longtermcare.gov/Main_Site/Finding/

Posted 05-31-12

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Support Services for People Living with Cancer

Information from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) about support services for people living with cancer and their families. Get connected to more than 100 organizations nationwide that provide emotional, practical, and financial help. You can also get live, online assistance from the NCI’s LiveHelp service.

Here is the link: http://supportorgs.cancer.gov/home.aspx

Posted 05-30-12

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It’s All in Your Head

By Guest Bloggers Wayne Connell, Founder & President, Invisible Disabilities Association, and Jeff Vankooten, Professional Speaker and Invisible Disabilities Association Executive Board Member

It’s all in your head!” What a familiar refrain for those living with chronic illness, pain or disability. Doctors, friends, co-workers and family often make this statement when they can’t “see” what you are going through or find a diagnosis. The invisible nature of many illnesses and disabilities creates an atmosphere of suspicion or disbelief, even by those who are closest to you. People may say, “It’s all in your head” to imply that the person is just making up or exaggerating his or her condition. Many people live with the stigma of this label. Some even feel shame and…

Here is the link: http://usodep.blogs.govdelivery.com/2012/05/30/its-all-in-your-head/

Posted 05-30-12

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Smartphone Accessibility

Find out about accessibility features of the latest smartphones. You can also watch a 45 minute video on smartphone accessibility. You must have Adobe Flash downloaded on your computer to watch the captioned video.

Visit Disability.gov for information about other kinds of assistive and accessible technologies and where you can purchase or borrow them.

Posted 05-08-12

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White House Announces 300,000 Summer Jobs & Other Employment Opportunities for Youth

The White House Summer Jobs+ initiative provides low-income and disadvantaged youth employment opportunities. The initiative includes 90,000 paid jobs, thousands of mentorships, internships and other training opportunities. Summer+ Jobs Bank is an online search tool that helps young people find jobs, internships and year-round work.

Visit Disability.gov for help with your job search, as well as information about career planning, job training, job accommodations and other employment-related resources.

Posted 05-07-12

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Career Connection: Can You Still Receive Social Security Disability Benefits if You Are Working from Home?

By Guest Blogger Shelly Goldman, Career Coach, Executive Recruiter and President of Goldman Group Advantage

Most people might be surprised to know that special rules make it possible for people receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to work and still receive monthly payments. While it might sound questionable, it actually makes perfect sense. Why punish someone who is interested in trying to go back to work? If they did, no one would ever be encouraged to try! To assist people with disabilities in returning to the workforce, the Social Security Administration (SSA) has developed a number of work incentives…

Visit Disability.gov for more information about how Social Security can help you return to work, where to find job opportunities, plan for a career, and many other resources that can help you find employment and succeed in the workplace.

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Depression & Anxiety Linked to Physical Disabilities in Seniors

Seniors with mental distress such as depression or anxiety are more likely to have physical disabilities, according to a new Australian study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Regular physical activity can protect older adults against such problems.

Visit Disability.Blog to read and comment on issues of interest to the disability community.

Posted 04-08-12

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Justice Department’s Revised ADA Design Standards Take Effect

The 2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design took effect yesterday. The standards are part of the revised regulations for Title II and Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA). The new standards will make buildings and facilities accessible to more than 54 million Americans with disabilities. The accessibility requirements apply to many kinds of facilities, including sports stadiums, court rooms, amusement rides, swimming pools and play areas. The requirements for existing swimming pools will be extended for 60 days.

For more news and events visit https://www.disability.gov/news/list.

Posted 03-16-12

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HHS Takes Action to Make Sure People Who Are Deaf & Hard of Hearing Can Access Medical Care

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Advanced Dialysis Centers (ADC) have reached a settlement agreement that provides individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing with equal access to services at the dialysis center. Equal access is required under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act. This settlement resulted from a complaint filed by a family member about a deaf patient at ADC not being provided a sign language interpreter.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/civil_rights/enforcing_the_ada_%26_other_laws.

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The Lifeline and Link Up programs help low-income households get telephone service.

Lifeline provides discounts on one basic monthly phone service (landline or wireless). The discount can be up to $10.00 per month, depending on the state.

Link Up provides a one-time discount (up to a maximum of $30) off of the initial installation fee for a landline or the activation fee for wireless phone service.

For more information on these program, including eligibility requirements, visit the Universal Service Administrative Company or call 1-888-641-8722. You can also contact your local phone service provider or call the Federal Communications Commission at 1-888-CALL-FCC.

Posted 02-26-12
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TSA Launches New Toll Free Number for Air Travelers with Disabilities

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has launched a new helpline number for air travelers with disabilities and medical conditions. You can call TSA Cares toll free at 1-855-787-2227 before you travel for answers to questions about screening policies, procedures and what to expect at the security checkpoint. TSA recommends that passengers call about 72 hours before traveling so that when needed, TSA Cares can coordinate checkpoint support with a TSA Customer Service Manager at the airport.

Looking for information about organizations, programs and services near you? Visit Disability.gov’s Information by State section.

Posted 12-23-11

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Think Beyond the Label (TBTL) Creates New Jobs Portal for People with Disabilities

TBTL’s online jobs portal connects job seekers with disabilities to employers actively looking to hire them. This new job-search engine gives people looking for employment opportunities free access to nearly 1 million job listings from more than 90,000 screened employers in the private and public sectors.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/employment/news_%26_events.

Updated 12-21-11

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New Educational Video about Medicare in American Sign Language (ASL)

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services has released an educational video about the Medicare program in ASL for people who are deaf or hard of hearing. The video gives an overview of the Medicare program, including what Medicare is, who qualifies, the four parts (A, B, C and D), new preventive services under the Affordable Care Act, and help paying Medicare costs.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/benefits/social_security_disability_benefits/social_security_disability_insurance_%28ssdi%29/medicare.

Updated 12-05-11

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AARP’s Five-Step Toolkit for Job Seekers

An online employment guide that covers the entire job search process from start to finish. Helps you to set work goals, organize your job search activities, conduct a career exploration to find out which jobs are best for you and learn how to increase your success in finding a job.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/employment/career_planning/career_planning_tools.

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Want to learn more about Disability.gov and how to find the information you’re looking for? Check out these new, captioned videos that guide you through the site. The videos explain Disability.gov’s accessibility features, different ways to search for information on the site, how to create your personal My Disability.gov account, and other tools and features that make it easy for you to quickly locate the information and resources you want. A text version of “How to Use this Site” is also available.

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Preparing for Postsecondary Education Update: Navigating College – A Handbook on Self Advocacy for Students with Autism

Navigating College – A Handbook on Self Advocacy for Students with Autism

Handbook from The Autistic Self Advocacy Network written by adults and youth with autism for current and future college students with autism. Discusses disability and special education laws that apply to students from grades K-12 and how students in college must advocate for themselves. Also includes information on independent living, health and safety, and social issues. You can order a copy or download the book in PDF format from the website.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/education/student_resources/self-advocacy.

Updated 10-27-11

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Bookshare

Provides accessible books, newspapers, magazines and other printed materials to readers with print disabilities. Free for U.S. schools and all U.S. students with qualifying disabilities.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/technology/providers_%26_programs/non-profit_organizations.

Updated 10-20-11

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State & Local Community Life Resources Update: The Sibling Support Project

The Sibling Support Project

A national effort dedicated to the life-long concerns of brothers and sisters of people who have special health, developmental, or mental health concerns. The Project also holds workshops around the country.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/community_life/disability_organizations.

Updated 10-19-11

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Technology Update: Accessible Technology Coalition (ATC)

Accessible Technology Coalition (ATC)

Provides people with disabilities, and those who work with them, answers to questions about assistive technology (AT) so they can identify the solutions that work best for them. AT is any device, hardware, software or handheld equipment that enables a person to participate in life’s activities. ATC also has a searchable collection of easy-to-understand articles on many different types of technologies and online webinars and trainings.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/technology/accessible_technology.

Updated 10-19-11

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Workplace Accommodat​ions for Job Seekers Update: Living & Working with Epilepsy

Living & Working with Epilepsy

Information from the Epilepsy Foundation on employment-related topics including finding employment, safety sensitive jobs, disclosing your epilepsy and frequently asked questions.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/employment/working_with_a_disability_%26_employment_supports/job_accommodations.

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Disability.gov Employment Laws & Regulations for Employers Update: Questions Employers Can Ask When Interviewi​ng an Applicant with a Disability

Questions Employers Can Ask When Interviewing an Applicant with a Disability

Training session from the Disability Program Navigator Initiative that explains what types of questions are legal for employers to ask when interviewing a person with a disability.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/employment/employer_resources/interviewing.

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Social Security Expands List of Compassionate Allowances Conditions

The Social Security Administration has added 13 new conditions involving the immune system and neurological disorders to its Compassionate Allowances program. This program speeds up disability decisions to make sure that Americans with the most serious disabilities receive their benefit decisions within days instead of months or years. The conditions include certain cancers, adult brain disorders, a number of rare genetic disorders of children, early-onset Alzheimer’s disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/benefits/news_%26_events.

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Partners in Employment

A free self-study course to help people with developmental disabilities build practical skills to find jobs. The course will help you understand the hiring process, supported and competitive employment, and how to identify your strengths and skills and how they might translate into a career.

This information was recently updated. To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/employment/career_planning/career_planning_tools.

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New “Green Jobs” Resource Guide for Individuals with Disabilities

The U.S. Department of Labor held a roundtable to develop recommendations to include people with disabilities in the “green jobs” market. Green jobs are jobs in industries that help the environment or use environment-friendly materials and processes. This companion guide to the roundtable’s report includes information about where to search for jobs, training opportunities and job skills associated with the increase in “green” jobs.

This information was recently updated. To learn more visit https://www.disability.gov/employment/news_%26_events.

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Federal Student Aid Grant Programs

The federal government provides grant funds for students attending colleges, career schools and universities. Grants are not loans and do not have to be repaid. Information about scholarships is also available. Enter the word disability in the search to find scholarships that are specifically for students with disabilities, or you can just search for a field of study or major such as music, law enforcement, biology, social work, etc.
For more information visit https://www.disability.gov/education/financial_aid_%26_scholarships/grants.

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Social Security Benefits for People Who Are Blind or Have Low Vision

Information about disability benefits that are available to you if you are blind or have low vision and can’t work. You may be able to get disability benefits even if you are not legally blind. Social Security also has work incentives that can help you go back to work and still receive benefits.

For more information visit:

https://www.disability.gov/benefits/social_security_disability_benefits/supplemental_security_income_%28ssi%29/qualifying_for_benefits.

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Five Things People with Medicare Should Know

Do you have Medicare? Have questions about what the Affordable Care Act does for you? Read the about five things people with Medicare should know about the law.

For more information visit https://www.disability.gov/health/health_insurance/medicare.

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Accessibility & Universal Design Update: Home Modifications for Bathrooms

Provides step-by-step information about making home bathroom modifications for a person with a disability. Includes how to determine what needs to be changed, what to do if you are a renter, how to find a contractor to do the work and how to pay for it.

For more information visit https://www.disability.gov/community_life/independent_living/accessible_design.

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Alzheimer’​s Association 24/7 Helpline

Provides information and support to people with memory loss, caregivers, health care professionals and the general public. Call toll-free anytime day or night at 1-800-272-3900, TDD 1-866-403-3073. The Helpline can also give you referrals to local community programs, services and ongoing support.

For more information visit https://www.disability.gov/health/caregiver_%26_provider_resources/caregivers.

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Serving Children with Disabilities Placed by Their Parents at Private Schools

Answers questions about what services children with disabilities are entitled to under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act when they are placed in private schools by their parents. Topics include services, transportation, equipment, supplies, and home schooling for children with disabilities.

For more information visit https://www.disability.gov/education/parent_resources/education_laws_%26_regulations.

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Making a Website Accessible

The Job Accommodation Network’s SNAP Process and Tool can help you work through the most common website accessibility issues. Watch a webcast that takes you through the SNAP process for fixing common accessibility problems. Handouts about website accessibility are also available to download.

For more information visit https://www.disability.gov/technology/accessible_technology.

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Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP)

Managing Agency U.S. Department of Energy http://www.energy.gov/

Program Description
The Former Worker Program (FWP) identifies, notifies, and makes medical screening services available, at no cost, to the more than 600,000 former employees who have worked in the weapons complex during the past 60-plus years for the Department of Energy (DOE) or its predecessor agencies (the Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration). DOE funds external teams of health experts to independently offer medical screening to former workers for potential adverse health outcomes related to occupational exposures to such conditions as radiation, noise, beryllium, asbestos, lasers, silica, and other occupational exposures. The FWP was first established following the issuance of the Fiscal Year 1993 Defense Authorization Act (Public Law 102-484), which called for DOE to assist workers with determining whether they had health issues related to their prior work with DOE.

General Program Requirements
Workers eligible for this program include all former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees from all DOE sites.

Your Next Steps
The following information will lead you to the next steps to apply for this benefit.

Application Process
For more information, see the Program Contact Information below.

Program Contact Information

A list of the FWP projects by state in which the DOE site is located, including toll-free phone numbers and websites associated with each project, can be found at:http://www.hss.doe.gov/HealthSafety/FWSP/formerworkermed/factsheets.html

For additional information on the FWP, visit:http://www.hss.doe.gov/HealthSafety/FWSP/formerworkermed/index.html

Updated 07-23-11

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On March 16, 2011, the FCC’s Emergency Access Advisory Committee (EAAC) released a national on-line survey to determine the
most effective and efficient technologies and methods by which persons with disabilities may access Next Generation 9-1-1
emergency services systems. Among other things, the survey asks about accessing emergency services via video, text, and voice.
The results of the survey will inform the EAAC as it develops recommendations for the FCC to draft rules to ensure that people with
disabilities can access NG 9-1-1 services. The survey is available in English, Spanish and American Sign Language (ASL) video).

This survey will be available until April 24, 2011. We encourage people with disabilities to complete this survey, and share
information about the survey with other people with disabilities and organizations that represent persons with disabilities.

Link to the survey in English and ASL:

http://fcc.eaac.sgizmo.com/s3

Link to the survey in Spanish:

http://fcc.eaac-es.sgizmo.com/s3

News Release regarding EAAC Survey:

http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2011/db0316/DOC-305233A1.doc

http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2011/db0316/DOC-305233A1.pdf

http://www.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2011/db0316/DOC-305233A1.txt

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Supportive housing – permanent, affordable housing linked to services – provides low-income people with disabilities and formerly
homeless people with the help and support they need to stay housed and live more independent, healthy and fulfilling lives.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/housing/housing_assistance/supportive_housing

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Provides information on workplace trends, the value of work and available programs and supports for parents of children with
developmental disabilities, as they help their children prepare for a fulfilling and constructive role in the workforce. Though this
document was developed for residents of New Jersey, it contains tips and guidance that can benefit parents across the country.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/education/parent_resources/developmental_&_intellectual_disabilities

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This self-paced seminar gives an overview of Workplace Personal Assistance Services (WPAS). Many aspects of WPAS are
examined including assistive technology, self-employment, funding and employers’ perspectives. Many people think that WPAS is an
accommodation that may only be needed by individuals with physical disabilities, but individuals with sensory impairments, cognitive
limitations and mental illness can benefit from WPAS too.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.
gov/employment/workplace_accommodations_&_supports/personal_assistance_services

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FEMA Issues New Guidance to Support People with Disabilities During Disasters

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) today announced new guidelines on emergency
sheltering to help state planners and non-profit organizations ensure that people with access and functional needs receive lawful and
equitable assistance in the aftermath of a disaster.

The Functional Needs Support Services Guidance, or FNSS, gives state governments recommendations to help them provide
emergency sheltering services that meet the needs of their communities and are in compliance with existing federal laws designed
to prevent discrimination on the basis of disability. These laws include the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Stafford Act, the Fair
Housing Act, the Rehabilitation Act, the Architectural Barriers Act and the Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act.

“At FEMA, we don’t plan for easy, we plan for real — and that means doing a better job of meeting the needs of people with disabilities
when a disaster strikes,” said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate. “We have to start by supporting and encouraging our entire
emergency management team, including our state and local partners, to integrate the needs of people with disabilities into all of their
planning. These guidelines are an important step forward in these efforts, and will help ensure that shelters better meet the needs of
evacuees with disabilities, from providing sleeping arrangements, to meeting hygiene and dietary needs, to accommodating for
service animals.”

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, one in every five Americans has some type of disability. The FNSS guidance encourages
emergency managers to integrate the needs of people with disabilities – and all populations in their communities – into every aspect of
their planning for disaster preparedness, response and recovery operations.

Planning for the whole community and incorporating the needs of people with disabilities into disaster operations has been a top
priority for Fugate since coming to FEMA. In September, FEMA hosted its first-ever “Getting Real” conference, which brought
together stakeholders from the disability and emergency management communities to discuss how we can better partner together
and integrate the needs of people with disabilities into our emergency planning. Read more about this conference.

Learn more about FEMA’s Office of Disability Integration and Coordination and find out more about the Functional Needs Support
Services Guidance.

FEMA’s mission is to support our first responders and ensure that as a nation we work together to build, sustain, and improve our
capability to prepare for, protect against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate all hazards.

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“Soft skills” include the ability to communicate effectively, work on a team and use problem-solving skills. These skills are
necessary to succeed in the workplace and can be taught. These resources describe the importance of using technology, role play
and simulations of real-life workplace situations to teach these kinds of skills.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/education/educator_resources/transition_planning/school_to_work

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Check out these resources about the EITC recently added to Disability.gov. EITC is a federal income tax credit for people who work,
but don’t earn much money. If you qualify, you could pay less federal tax or even get a refund.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/employment/work_incentives/tax_credits

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The VA has begun distributing disability benefits to Vietnam Veterans who qualify for compensation under recently liberalized rules
for Agent Orange exposure. Up to 200,000 Vietnam Veterans may be eligible to receive VA disability compensation for medical
conditions associated with Agent Orange. Veterans interested in applying for disability compensation based on chronic b-cell
leukemias, Parkinson’s disease or ischemic heart disease should visit the Agent Orange Fast Track Claims Processing System or
call 1-800-827-1000.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/benefits/other_benefits_programs/veterans_&_military

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Disability.gov’s Jobs & Career Planning section was recently updated with several new resources, including A Career Guide to
Industries and a Skills Profiler.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/employment/jobs_&_career_planning/career_counseling

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Disability.gov’s Community Life section for California was recently updated with several new resources, including information about
the Tarjan Center Service Inclusion Project, which works to make service and volunteer opportunities accessible to people with and
without disabilities.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/state/california/community_life

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New Online “Return-to-Work” Toolkit for Employees & Employers
This new toolkit helps employers and employees understand the return-to-work process. It provides resources to help get
employees who experience an illness or injury back on the job quickly and smoothly. The employee toolkit includes information about
job accommodations, preparing for a job interview, resume writing, self-employment and employment-related laws. The employer
toolkit has information about strategies such as offering the opportunity to work part-time, telecommuting, modifying work duties or
schedules, as well as resources that can help employers retain the talents of older workers.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/employment/news_%26_events

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FSD works to increase opportunities in science for students with disabilities. Awards of $1,000 each will be made to fourth year
undergraduate (who have been accepted to graduate or professional school) and graduate students who have a disability. The
awards are for students pursuing a science project or thesis in any field of Mathematics, Science, Medicine, Engineering or
Computer Science. Application deadline is December 1, 2010.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/education/financial_aid/grants

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Explains the employment-related rights of people with disabilities under the ADA. Includes answers to questions about reasonable
accommodations and what to do if you think your rights have been violated.

For more information visit this link: http://www.disability.gov/employment/laws_%26_regulations

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Program Description
Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Programs care for a wide range of problems. A veteran’s needs might be in any of
the following areas—
•Medical
•Psychiatric
•Vocational
•Educational
•Social

Treatment and rehabilitation are provided by a team of professionals in an environment where veterans support each other as they
focus on developing greater independence.

General Program Requirements
Domiciliary Care is not part of the Medical Benefits Package.

But, to begin with, you must be enrolled in the VA health care system (or qualify based on one of the exceptions in the law) and thus
be eligible for the Medical Benefits Package.

To see the basic Medical Benefits Package entry, go to the “Search” box at the top right area of this page and type in the entry below.
Be sure to include the quotation marks.

“Basic Medical Benefits for Veterans”

Further, Domiciliary Care has some eligibility rules of its own. You must meet one of these criteria:

•Your annual income must not exceed the maximum annual Improved Disability VA Pension Rate

OR

•VA must determine that you have no adequate means of support

You can find the special eligibility rules for Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation and Treatment (Domiciliary Care) in the Code of
Federal Regulations (CFR). Here are the references: Title 38, CFR 17.46, 17.47, and 17.48. They’re available on the Web at either of
these sites:

Government Printing Office (Standard Site) http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_06/38cfr17_06.html.

Government Printing Office (Continuously Updated Site) http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?
c=ecfr&sid=9dcfd440fc9f4d91d9bc92c8bfa15677&tpl=/ecfrbrowse/Title38/38cfr17_main_02.tpl.

In addition, we must find that you’re capable of handling the activities of daily living by yourself and that you’re willing to participate in
your own treatment. Here are the issues we must consider in determining whether domiciliary care is right for you:

1.Are you interested in working with us to identify goals for improving your quality of life? This would require participating in a
program that works on physical and emotional health issues and looks at how you’ve been functioning in your family and community.

2.Do you need help in learning how to get along more independently in your community?

3.Do you need treatment for medical, mental health, or substance abuse problems?

4.Are you willing to join with a whole group of veterans and VA staff that works together to help members heal physically and
emotionally, and gain as much independence as possible?

5.Are you able to accomplish the ordinary activities of daily living, including personal care, with no help or very little help? This might
include the ability to use a wheelchair or other assistive devices.

6.Are you able to live in a “community” of veterans without posing a risk to yourself or to others?

Even if we decide that our program is not a good “fit” for you, we may be able to help you find some other arrangement that does
work.

Your Next steps the following information will lead you to the next steps to apply for this benefit.
Application Process
For more information, see the Program Contact Information below.

Program Contact Information
For more information please visit:
http://www.va.gov/healtheligibility/coveredservices/SpecialBenefits.asp#Dom…

You can find the locations of the domiciliaries at this site:
http://www2.va.gov/directory/guide/division_flsh.asp?dnum=1

Managing Agency
Veterans Health Administration (VHA)
http://www1.va.gov/health

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The new online Disability Nondiscrimination Law Advisor helps employers quickly and easily determine which federal disability
nondiscrimination laws apply to their business or organization and their responsibilities under them. The law advisor asks users to
answer a few questions to take into account variables such as the nature of an organization, staff size and whether the business or
organization receives federal financial assistance. Based on responses provided, the law advisor generates a customized list of
federal disability nondiscrimination laws that likely apply, along with easy-to-understand information about employers’
responsibilities under each of them.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link: http://www.disability.gov/employment/news_%
26_events.

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Program Description
Each state receives money to help parents identify if their infant or toddler (birth through age two) is disabled. If a child is found to be
experiencing any sort of developmental delay (cognitive, physical, communication, social, emotional or self-help), the state may then
(at a minimum) provide the funds for evaluations and assessments, service coordination and the development and review of an
Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP), which are available at no cost for eligible infants and toddlers with disabilities. Other early
intervention services designed to meet the unique needs of the child may be provided on a fee-for-service or sliding fee scale on a
state-by-state basis.
General Program Requirements
In order to qualify for this benefit program, a child must be under the age of three years and be experiencing some sort of
developmental delay (cognitive, physical, communication, social, emotional or self-help). Please note: additional eligibility criteria
vary by state. For specific information about your state’s eligibility criteria, visit http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/osep/index.
html.

Your Next steps the following information will lead you to the next steps to apply for this benefit.
Application Process
For information on how to access services in your area, contact your state’s Early Intervention Program Coordinator. The list of
coordinators can be found at http://www.nectac.org/contact/ptccoord.asp.

Program Contact Information
Parent Centers are available in each state to provide training and information to parents and professionals working with children with
disabilities. For more information about this resource, visit:
http://www.ed.gov/programs/osepgts/index.html

For more information about this program, visit:
http://www.ed.gov/programs/osepeip/index.html

Managing Agency
U.S. Department of Education
http://www.ed.gov

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Program Description
The Centers for Independent Living program provides grants for consumer-controlled, community-based, cross-disability,
nonresidential, private nonprofit agencies that are designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities and
provide an array of independent living services.
Services provided by the centers may include but are not limited to: information and referrals; independent living skills training; peer
counseling; individual and systems advocacy; community planning and decision making; peer counseling, role modeling; interacting
with local, state and Federal legislators; and staging recreational events that integrate individuals with disabilities with their non-
disabled peers.

General Program Requirements
In order to be eligible for this program, an individual must have a disability that prevents them from holding a job or functioning
independently.

Your Next steps the following information will lead you to the next steps to apply for this benefit.
Application Process
Application processes and services vary by state. To find a center near you, visit:
http://www.virtualcil.net/cils/

Program Contact Information
For more information, visit:
http://www.ed.gov/programs/cil/index.html

For more information and resources on Independent Living, visit:
http://www.jik.com/ilcs.html

If you have questions about this program, visit:
http://www.ed.gov/programs/cil/contacts.html

Managing Agency
U.S. Department of Education
http://www.ed.gov

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Program Description
The Client Assistance Program (CAP) was established to advise and inform clients, client applicants, and other individuals with
disabilities of all the available services and benefits under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and of the services and
benefits available to them under Title I of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Services include advising and informing
individuals of their rights in direct connection with programs authorized under the Act, including advocacy services. CAP does not
provide financial, housing or medical benefits directly to individuals with disabilities.
General Program Requirements
In order to be eligible for this program, you or a household or family member must be disabled.

Your Next steps the following information will lead you to the next steps to apply for this benefit.
Application Process
To utilize the CAP services you must directly contact your state’s CAP administering agency. Your state’s CAP administering agency
will determine your eligibility and further information will be provided to you at that time.

Please visit the following website for your state’s contact information:
http://www.icdri.org/legal/CAP.htm

Program Contact Information
For more information on this program, please visit:
http://www.ed.gov/programs/rsacap/index.html

Managing Agency
U.S. Department of Education
http://www.ed.gov

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Program Description
The program offers tax credit or relief for special tax situations of active members of the U.S. Armed Forces.
General Program Requirements
In order to qualify for this benefit program, you must have been in active military service for at least 24 months and you must be a
taxpayer who is interested in receiving tax information and tax preparation assistance.

Your Next steps the following information will lead you to the next steps to apply for this benefit.
Application Process
No application is needed to utilize this program. However, you must file your taxes using the guidelines posted at http://www.irs.
gov/publications/p3/index.html.

Program Contact Information
For more information, visit:
http://www.irs.gov/newsroom/article/0,,id=97273,00.html

Or contact your local Taxpayer Assistance Center:
http://www.irs.gov/localcontacts/index.html

For additional information contact:
IRS Tax Forms & Publications
SE:W:CAR:MP:FP, IR-6526
1111 Constitution Ave NW
Washington, DC 20224

Managing Agency
U.S. Department of the Treasury
http://www.ustreas.gov/

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The Homeless Veterans’ Reintegration Program (HVRP) National Technical Assistance Center is hosting a series of conference calls
on Job Development in Tough Times, Substance Abuse and Employment of Homeless Veterans and Green Jobs. These conference
calls will be divided by region. To find out what region your state is in please visit the HVRP region’s page.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link: http://www.disability.
gov/employment/jobs_&_career_planning/veterans_&_military.

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SBDCs provide assistance to current and prospective small business owners. These local centers offer information to meet the
needs of small businesses, including counseling, technical assistance and training in areas related to business start up, operations
and management.

You are subscribed to Self Employment/Entrepreneurship for Disability.gov. This information has recently been updated, and can be
read by visiting this link:

http://www.disability.gov/employment/self-employment_&_entrepreneurship/starting_a_business.

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The benefits section of Disability.gov has been updated with several new fact sheets for Veterans including Automobile & Special
Adaptive Equipment Grants, Benefits for Filipino Veterans and Disability Compensation for Sexual or Personal Trauma.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link:

http://www.disability.gov/benefits/other_benefits_programs/veterans_&_military.

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To expedite the delivery of benefits to many injured Service Members who receive disability compensation from the Department of
Veterans Affairs (VA), the Department announced the expansion of a program with the Department of Defense (DoD) to streamline
the application process for people retiring or exiting the military due to disabilities. The Disability Evaluation System (DES) pilot began
in November 2007 and is expanding to an additional six military installations, bringing the total number to 27 military facilities where a
single physical examination serves as the basis for determining whether military personnel are fit enough to stay on active duty and
to determine their eligibility for VA disability compensation.

You are subscribed to Veterans’ Benefits for Disability.gov. This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting
this link:

http://www.disability.gov/benefits/other_benefits_programs/veterans_&_military.

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Guide from the Corporation for National and Community Service that provides information on how to include individuals with
disabilities in national and community service programs. The guide provides information about creating an inclusive environment, a
brief historical overview of social perceptions of people with disabilities, disability-related laws, how to write inclusive service
descriptions, recruitment and outreach, and accommodations issues and legal requirements.

You are subscribed to Volunteering & Community Service for Disability.gov. This information has recently been updated, and can be
read by visiting this link: http://www.disability.gov/community_life/volunteering_%26_national_service_programs.

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Having a disability alone may not make someone at higher risk for complications from the H1N1 virus, but other factors may put
people with certain disabilities at higher risk. People who have difficulty breathing (ventilator users and individuals with asthma and
other respiratory conditions); individuals who have difficulty fighting infections or who are immunocompromised; and people of any
age who have chronic health conditions such as heart disease, diabetes or sickle cell anemia, are at higher risk of acquiring the
H1N1 infection. Visit the Flu Shot Locator to find places near you to get a flu shot.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link: http://www.disability.gov/health/news_%26_events.

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Program Description
To qualify for this benefit program, you must meet the following requirements:
•be at least age 65, or
•be blind or disabled, and
•have limited income and assets, and
•meet additional requirements.

Your Next steps the following information will lead you to the next steps to apply for this benefit.
Application Process
If you would like to find out if you may be eligible for any of the benefits SSA administers, visit http://best.ssa.gov.

Once you have completed the eligibility screening questionnaire, you will be provided with a list of benefits for which you may be
eligible. Print this page for your records before going to the application site.

Once you know which benefits you can apply for, go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/applyonline/ to apply online.

You can also call 1-800-772-1213 (TTY: 1-800-325-0778) for additional information about SSA benefits and for application information.

Program Contact Information
For more information on this and any SSA benefit, call:
1-800-772-1213 (TTY: 1-800-325-0778)

Visit our Publications page for detailed information about SSA programs and policies:
http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/

Managing Agency
U.S. Social Security Administration
http://www.socialsecurity.gov

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Employers that have a demonstrated commitment to hiring people with disabilities are encouraged to consider becoming Employer
Partners of the Ticket to Work Program. Being an Employer Partner allows companies to gain exposure to thousands of Americans
with disabilities with a link to their career or job posting websites.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link: http://www.disability.
gov/employment/employing_people_with_disabilities/recruiting_&_hiring

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Provides education, training and employment for people with developmental, physical and mental disabilities. Also offers a housing
program for people with disabilities in the Portland area.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link:

http://www.disability.gov/state/oregon/employment.

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CAL is a disability resource center for people with disabilities, governed by people with disabilities. Its programs and services include
providing information and referrals, independent living skills, nursing home transition as well as employment and housing programs.
This program is for Kentucky….

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link:
http://www.disability.gov/state/kentucky/community_life.

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The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) and Employment and Training Administration
(ETA) will hold a National Workforce Investment Act (WIA) “listening session” for disability stakeholders on October 1, 2009 from 2:
00-5:00 pm ET. The purpose of the session is to gather recommendations from a disability perspective for the reauthorization of the
Workforce Investment Act of 1998. For more information and to register to attend or participate in this event read the invitation letter.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link: http://www.disability.gov/employment/news_%
26_events.

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Each year plans change what they cost and what they cover. The next general open enrollment starts on November 15, 2009. During
this time, people with Medicare can add, drop or change their prescription drug coverage. They can also select a health plan for their
2010 coverage. Visit My Medicare Tools for more information and resources.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link:

http://www.disability.gov/health/health_insurance/medicare.

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This guide is for people who care for family members or others with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) at home. Includes information about
how AD changes a person; coping with these changes; helping family and friends understand AD; making your home safe for the
person with AD; and managing everyday activities like eating, bathing, dressing and grooming.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link:

http://www.disability.gov/health/caregiver_&_provider_resources/caregivers.

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The U.S. Department of Education’s Guide to Federal Student Aid (2009-2010) provides information for students and families on
applying for federal student aid to pay for post-secondary education. This guide explains the application process, the various federal
loans, grants and work-study programs available, and how to apply for them. This information is also available in Spanish.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link: http://www.disability.
gov/education/financial_aid/loans.

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People with disabilities who want to start a business can find assistance and support from a number of different local agencies. This
fact sheet lists some of the many business resources that are available across the country that can help you become self-employed
or start a small business.

You are subscribed to Self Employment/Entrepreneurship for Disability.gov. This information has recently been updated, and can be
read by visiting this link: http://www.disability.gov/employment/self-employment_&_entrepreneurship/starting_a_business

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http://www.housingworks.org/need-help/ i dedicated to those in NY with HIV/AIDS

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If you have a sensory and/or mobility impairment you may be eligible to participate in a new research project of the Washington
University School of Medicine’s Program in Occupational Therapy. This research aims to understand what people with sensory
and/or mobility impairments do in their daily lives, how their environments affect their community participation and what, if any, help
they need to complete activities.

This information has recently been updated, and can be read by visiting this link:

http://www.disability.gov/community_life/news_%26_events

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WE LEAVE NO STONE UNTURNED WHEN IT COMES TO HELPING OTHERS!!

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